0401April’s Challenge:
The Plank.

Beginning today, you’ll hold Plank position for either 30 seconds or 1 minute (your choice). Each day moving forward, you’ll add 5 seconds to your total time. So, by April 30, you should be holding Plank for 195 seconds, or 3 minutes and 15 seconds. Start with a minute, you’ll be at 225 seconds, or 3 minutes and 45 seconds. You want a real Challenge? Start with 1 minute and add 10 seconds each day. That will land you at a 4/30 Plank hold of 5 minutes and 50 seconds. The important part of this Challenge will be to just stick with it. Don’t forget. It’s a small increment each day. Your core will thank you.

Keep your butt down.


Tuesday> WoD: For 15 minutes, on the minute, complete 40m Shuttle Run + 3 Burpees + 10 Sit Ups. Game: Crawling Hand Slaps. Finisher: Hill Sprints every 30 seconds for 5 minutes.



4.2.14: Run, Jump, Bike…Run More, Sweat A Lot

body-weight-crossfit-runner-e1387334359401

4.2.14: The Pit @ 6am

800m Run
100 Double Unders
200m Run
20 Calories on AirDyne
200m Run
3x 100m Sprints: Run Frontwards 50m/Backwards 50m
400m Run
4x Suicides (25m out/back, 50m out/back)
400m Run

The weather is improving, so we’re going to be outside as much as possible. We want you to keep moving and to keep moving fast. The movements and distances are varied to break up the work and to allow you to keep up the intensity.


BC 4/2

Wednesday> WoD: 30 Push Ups, 30 Walking Lunges, 800m Run; 20 Push Ups, 20 Walking Lunges, 400m Run; 10 Push Ups, 10 Walking Lunges, 400m Run.
Finish with Core Work.


CF Blog April 2

Skill: Double Unders – if you have DU’s do 3 x max rep DU’sphoto-18

WOD 1:
AMRAP 5
7 Toes 2 Bar
7 Wall Balls (20/14)
7 Burpees

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 2:
AMRAP 5
7 Ring Rows
7 Push-ups
7 Ball Slams (30/20)

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 3:
AMRAP 5
250m Row
25 Abmat Sit-ups


great post from our friends at modPALEO:

Food Quality and Your Health

by John Bartemus, Accelerate Chiropractic

foodqualityWhen speaking to groups about Paleo Nutrition, the room is often filled with people who have never heard the information before. These people are like I was before I learned the information, they are steeped in misinformation provided by Big Agriculture television commercials and the USDA’s MyPlate (formerly theFood Pyramid). They have been taught that food is food; and, a calorie is a calorie regardless of the source. Nothing could be further from the truth.

As an example, there is a very well known weight loss company/program that espouses that a calorie is a calorie, whether it comes from a grape or an M&M. To them, it doesn’t matter the source, as long as you are counting calories and not going over your daily allotment. Really?!

By this logic, you could eat all 2,000 of your daily allowed calories in M&Ms and be just as healthy as if you ate all 2,000 calories in grapes. Even when I was clueless about nutrition I would not believe this, and I know you are too smart for that logic too.

Inherently, we all know that food quality and food source matter. If we didn’t then we wouldn’t say things like “I shouldn’t have eaten that” or “I’ll be feeling that tomorrow.” How many of you have ever regretted eating a head of broccoli? Or a delicious grass-fed filet? None. But I know all of us have dominated a fast food meal or a large gluten bomb pizza and regretted it at one point or another.

So what is the point? The point is that food is not just food and a calorie is not just a calorie. The source of the food and calorie matters. The quality of the food and calorie matters. This is whymodPALEO does what they do. They know that the body is healthiest and functions its best when provided with food grown and sourced with the highest quality. This is why they go out of their way to use only grass-fed, local, pasture-raised meats and organically grown, local fruits and vegetables.

We have all heard “you are what you eat.” I like to also add, “you are what you eat, eats, too.” The quality of the diet of the meat you eat impacts your health. Take beef, for example. Cows are herbivores, they are grass eaters. They have a three-chambered stomach that is meant to digest and ferment grass. When cows eat grass on a real farm and have room to roam, they are happy cows. They are also Omega-3 fatty acid dominant cows. Meaning, their meat is heart healthy and anti-inflammatory. If you eat a healthy grass-fed cow, that beef is heart healthy and anti-inflammatory.

Cows that are raised on an industrial feedlot in Kansas are not happy cows. They are sad, sick cows. Why? Because they eat corn, soy, and alfalfa all day while standing in their own manure, unable to roam. Not only that, but the corn and soy they are eating have a high probability of being Genetically Modified. So not only are they not eating what they are born to eat, but they are eating Frankenfood. The cow’s three-chambered stomach cannot digest corn, soy, and alfalfa properly. This causes the cow’s immune system to attack the food with inflammation. Chronic inflammation causes the cow to be a pro-inflammatory Omega-6 fatty acid dominant cow. This cow develops cancer, tumors, heart disease, and obesity. If you eat beef from this cow every time you eat meat, will it make you healthy or sick?

Do you see now why quality and source matter? Do you see now that red meat isn’t bad? Only poor quality red meat raised at a poor source is bad. The same goes for your produce. There is a definite difference between organically grown, pesticide and herbicide free produce, and industrial produce.


CF WOD April 2

Skill: Double Unders – if you have DU’s do 3 x max rep DU’s

WOD 1:
AMRAP 5
7 Toes 2 Bar
7 Wall Balls (20/14)
7 Burpees

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 2:
AMRAP 5
7 Ring Rows
7 Push-ups
7 Ball Slams (30/20)

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 3:
AMRAP 5
250m Row
25 Abmat Sit-ups


0402MovNat

It’s a simple concept really. From their website: “MovNat is a physical education & fitness system based on the full range of natural human movement abilities. These include the locomotive skills of walking, running, jumping, balancing, crawling, climbing & swimming. In addition we practice the manipulative skills of lifting, carrying, throwing & catching. How we move is how we train.”

I had the privilege of joining one of their workshops this past weekend. The way I describe to folks is learning to play like a kid again. You know all those things you used to do when you were a kid? Looking for things to pick up, to throw, balance on and walk across, climb and conquer? That’s basically what this is. But they start with the basics, the stuff you’ve spent all these years UNlearning. I’m talking bare bones: posture and breathing. It’s amazing how much we take those two items for granted, and how they genuinely affect the quality of our everyday movement and life.

Primal playtime. I haven’t been this sore in a long, long time. And I had a lot of fun getting this sore. I know Bryan has done this workshop. Seek one out.

The takeaway: keep moving. Keep playing. It’s not about simply making time to work out in a controlled environment. It’s about just being active. Go outside and play.


Wednesday> WoD: 30 Push Ups, 30 Walking Lunges, 800m Run; 20 Push Ups, 20 Walking Lunges, 400m Run; 10 Push Ups, 10 Walking Lunges, 400m Run.
Finish with Core Work.

 


BC 4/3

Thursday> WoD1: Every 2min for 10min – Full Hill Run. WoD2: 12min AMRAP – 1 Wall Walk, 5 Mtn. Climbers, 5 Squats*  (*add 5 Mtn. Climbers and Squats each round)


CF Blog April 3

Strength: Weighted Chin-ups 5-5-3-3photo-19

WOD: (HQ 4/2/13)
10 Shoulder Press (115/75)
15 OHS (115/75)
20 Push Press (115/75)
25 Front Squats (115/75)
30 Push Jerk (115/75)
35 Back Squats (115/75)

*20 minute cap on WOD*


More food for thought from RealFoodLiz.com:

Why ghee is good for you (inside AND out!)

After having spent over a decade of my life in the trenches of fat-phobia; specifically saturated fat-phobia, I KNOW how hard it is to believe that ghee is good for you.

Ghee – which is a type of clarified butter; or, butter with all milk solids removed – has a long history in Indian cuisine. It’s delicious, sure. It’s unprocessed. You can make it at home (in contrast to the fats of conventional wisdom, which are birthed in a factory.) It’s basically all the goodness of butter, concentrated. What could be better?

But healthy? Naaah. Couldn’t be.

After all, not only is ghee an animal fat, but it’s a highly saturated animal fat. And if decades of Diet Industry conditioning has taught us anything, it’s that we should work out in thong leotards and leg warmers saturated animal fat is bad. Dangerous. Unhealthy.

And we shouldn’t just quit the sat fats. We should replace them with highly processed fats like corn oil, soybean oil, and canola oil. After all, nature’s got it all wrong. We need to get our food from factories.

Huh?

I busted the low-fat myth in my 7 reasons fat is your friend post, and I tackle all the saturated-fat-phobia AND animal-product-phobia at length in Eat the Yolks(If I do say so myself, it’s the PERFECT read for the Paleo, Primal and Real Food skeptic.)

In short – and this is stated in this study – “there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of [heart disease]“. As I discuss in my book, the cholesterol-satfat-heart disease triumvirate is finally circling the drain, too. From Eat the Yolks:

Saturated fat was demonized in the first place because we thought it raised cholesterol, which freaked us out because we’d been told that higher cholesterol led to heart disease. At some point, we stopped caring about the whole proposed chain of events—false as it is—and decided that saturated fat “clogged arteries” too, as if the human body were just a big jumble of copper plumbing and any type of fat or cholesterol would plug us up….

It sounds dumb because it is dumb. All the bullgarbage of the low-fat movement distracted us from the fact that real, natural fats like ghee (NOT factory-made, highly processed junk like corn oil, soybean oil, and canola oil) are the way to go.

(The bullgarbage has also led us to forget that animals are meant to be raised in a natural environment, on their natural diets; not in factory farms. This is why I don’t recommend animal products when you don’t trust the source. When I say “natural,” THAT is what I mean.)

Real, natural fats are awesome for good reason: They’re stable (that’s what saturated means), and they’re nutritious. Ghee, especially, is chock-full of nutrition. Isn’t that what we need? Nutrition?

 Continue reading… 


CF WOD April 3

Strength: Weighted Chin-ups 5-5-3-3

WOD: (HQ 4/2/13)
10 Shoulder Press (115/75)
15 OHS (115/75)
20 Push Press (115/75)
25 Front Squats (115/75)
30 Push Jerk (115/75)
35 Back Squats (115/75)

*20 minute cap on WOD*


0403Randoms

How big thinkers spent their days // DailyMail

Blues Bros go Legos // uncrate

Why we got gatter during the “fat-free” boom // NPR

Shakespearean Wordsmithing // Business Insider

Make Chipotle Employees Hate You // BuzzFeed

Madlib // Spin

Fish Fly // uncrate

Apple Breaks into Fitness // Outside Mag

Religion // Business Insider

The phrase “point of fact” annoys me.[hr]

Thursday> WoD1: Every 2min for 10min – Full Hill Run. WoD2: 12min AMRAP – 1 Wall Walk, 5 Mtn. Climbers, 5 Squats*  (*add 5 Mtn. Climbers and Squats each round)


CF Blog April 4

Strength: RDL 3-3-3-3photo-20

WOD:
3 Rounds
400m Med Ball Run (20/14)
30 Double Unders
1 Rope Climb
25 Abmat Sit-ups
15 Sledge Hammer Strikes

POST WOD: Group Stretch/Foam Roll

***

Last Call!!  The Blood Drive is tomorrow, 10-1!!!  I’ll bring cookies 🙂

*Tips for a Successful Donation*

Be sure to drink plenty of water the day before and day of donation. Also stay nourished with iron rich foods such as chicken, clams, dates, dried apricots, dried beans or peas, dried peaches, dried prunes or prune juice, eggs, enriched and whole grain breads, ham, iron-fortified cereal, liver, lean beef or pork, molasses (blackstrap), oysters, raisins, sardines, scallops, shrimp, tuna, veal and wheat germ.

Answers to Commonly Asked Eligibility Questions

One of the things that keeps many people from donating blood is a misconception about their eligibility. In truth, there are very few things that may prevent an otherwise healthy person from donating. Here are some answers to commonly asked questions about donor eligibility:

Can I give blood if I’m afraid of needles?
Most people do feel a bit of nervousness about blood donation. Most also say after their donation that they’re sorry they waited so long. Blood donation is a momentary discomfort for the donor that can provide a lifetime of difference for the patient.

Can I give blood if I recently got a tattoo or piercing?
Piercings do not disqualify you from donating blood as long as they were done with single-use, disposable equipment. Tattoos also do not disqualify you from donating if they were done with a single-use needle at a licensed facility.

Can I give blood if I have high blood pressure or high cholesterol?
As long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of your donation, you may give blood. Also, medications that you may be taking for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating. A high cholesterol level does not disqualify you from donating, even if medication is used to control it.

Can I give blood while I’m on medication?
In nearly all cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor. As long as you are healthy and the condition is under control, it is very likely you will be able to donate.

Can I give blood if I’m diabetic?
Diabetics may donate blood as long as the other medical requirements are met.

Can I give blood if I’m anemic?
Your hemoglobin (iron) level will be checked prior to donating blood. As long as levels are normal (12.5 is an acceptable level) on the day of donation, you may give.

Can I give blood if I had cancer?
While some types of cancer may disqualify you from donating, there are many circumstances under which you may donate blood after an appropriate waiting period. Please contact CBCC for more information.

Can I give blood if I have seasonal allergies?
Allergies, even those that need to be controlled by medication, will not prevent you from donating blood.

Can I give blood if I had a flu shot?
In fact, you may donate blood the same day you receive the vaccination.

Can I give blood if I have epilepsy or seizures?
Epilepsy or seizures do not disqualify you from donating as long as you have had no seizures for one year.

 


CF WOD April 4

Strength: RDL 3-3-3-3

WOD:
3 Rounds
400m Med Ball Run (20/14)
30 Double Unders
1 Rope Climb
25 Abmat Sit-ups
15 Sledge Hammer Strikes

POST WOD: Group Stretch/Foam Roll


0404Try this.

Stand up. Put your feet directly under your hips. (not outside your hips, directly underneath your hips. Now, squeeze your cheeks together and turn your hips under and forward. If that moved your knees forward, put ’em back underneath your hips. Now, engage your abs. Set your gaze as neutral, looking straight ahead. Then pick your shoulders straight up toward your ears, roll them back as far as you can and bring them down so your arms are straight in your shoulder sockets and your scapula are retracted against the back of your rib cage. Now imagine a string pulling the top of your head toward the ceiling.

Great.

Unclench your butt cheeks without adjusting anything else as set in the description above.

This is how you should stand all the time.

This is your natural posture.

If it doesn’t feel natural, work on restoring it.

Happy Weekend.

[hr]

Friday> @moga


4.5.14: Determined

010

4.5.14: AG Track @ 9:30am

WOD
6 Rounds
200m Run (1:00 rest)
400m Run (1:00 rest)

We’re going to keep trying until we can get this one in. If there’s a game going on, we’ll still get a run in. Meet to the left of the track (near the gazebo), and we’ll go to plan B. Otherwise, I’ll see you on the track

Picture: Josh Bridges on the sand run at the Crossfit Games back in 2011 smoking everyone on the first WOD.


BC 4/4

Friday> moga


CF Blog April 5

TKphoto-21

Complete as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of:
8 Strict Pull-ups
8 Box jumps, 36″ box
12 Kettlebell swings, 2 pood

***

 

TK_Hero_th.jpg

U.S. Army Major Thomas E. Kennedy, 35, of West Point, New York, assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based in Fort Carson, Colorado, died on August 8, 2012, of wounds suffered when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest in Kunar province, Afghanistan. He is survived by his wife Kami, son Brody, daughter Margaret, parents George and Patricia, and brothers John and George.

***

Good luck to our Cooper River Bridge Runners!!!  Go get ’em!!!


CF WOD April 5

WOD: “TK”
AMRAP 20
8 Strict Pull-ups
8 Box Jumps (36/28)
12 KB Swings (2/1.5)


CF Blog April 6

WOD:

Cody PR'd yesterday - first time donating!Cody PR’d yesterday – first time donating!

800m run
21 Wall Balls (20/14)
21 DB Snatch (35/20)
21 Abmat Sit-ups
400m Run
15 Wall Balls (20/14)
15 DB Snatch (35/20)
15 Abmat Sit-ups
400m Run
9 Wall Balls (20/14)
9 DB Snatch (35/20)
9 Abmat Sit-ups
800m Run

Post WOD: if time 5 frame Rowling Match


CF WOD April 6

WOD:
800m run
21 Wall Balls (20/14)
21 DB Snatch (35/20)
21 Abmat Sit-ups
400m Run
15 Wall Balls (20/14)
15 DB Snatch (35/20)
15 Abmat Sit-ups
400m Run
9 Wall Balls (20/14)
9 DB Snatch (35/20)
9 Abmat Sit-ups
800m Run

Post WOD: if time 5 frame Rowling Match


4.7.14: Lucky Shot

tumblr_ms3f72TcdP1rsftapo1_1280

WOD:
Run 1200m (rest 1:00)
Run 400m (rest 2:00)
Run 1200m (rest 1:00)
Run 400m (rest 2:00)

 

Note: The weather does not look like it’s going to be in our favor tomorrow, but we’re hoping we’ll get lucky. I will post both here and on FB if we need to cancel.


BC 4/7

Monday@Met> WoD 1: 50-40-30-20-10 Lunges with 10-20-30-40-50 Sit Ups. WoD 2: “Invisible Fran” 21-15-9 of Squats and Push Ups. WoD 3: Suicides. **PLUS Plank.


CF Blog April 7

Strength: Front Squat 5-5-5IMG_1334

WOD: “Tabata Twist” – finish as quickly as possible using tabata intervals
30 KB Swings (1.5/1)
30 Dynamic Push-ups
30 Jumping Squats
30 Ring Rows
30 Wall Balls (20/14)
30 Burpees
30 Abmat Sit-ups
30 Jumping Lunges (sub lunge steps)

***

Momma’s Quote of the Week:  “A good coach will make his players see what they can be rather than what they are.”—Ara Parseghian

***

Some snatch tips from Boxlifemagazine.com:

COMMON SNATCH MISTAKES & HOW TO CORRECT THEM

By Daniel Camargo

 

As complicated as Olympic weightlifting movements may seem, they really are simple. Some athletes might disagree when I say that the snatch is easier to learn than the clean and jerk. Why? Because they don’t feel a sense of control with their center of gravity.

Remember, an object’s center of gravity isn’t the ‘center’ of the object, but rather the point where the object can be balanced. As it relates to your body and the barbell during a lift, your center of gravity (or weight distribution) will always shift towards whichever is heavier. So when the bar is light, the center of gravity shifts towards your body. However, when the bar has heavy load, it will move towards the barbell. This is why it takes strength, coupled with speed, to keep us from leaning forward during these lifts. The overhead movement in the snatch challenges our sense of balance.

Let’s break down some common mistakes, to help you find the joy in the snatch.

Mistake #1: Jumping forward
The most common mistake athletes make.
When performing the snatch your feet can do one of two things: stay in one spot or hop back a little—and I mean a little; given that we receive the bar just behind our heads, moving back may be natural. What you should never do is jump forward, breaking the frontal plane. Doing so makes the bar feel heavier—and much harder to chase.

3 times you might make the mistake of jumping forward:

1. During liftoff, because you are: a) distributing your weight onto your toes in your initial pull as a result of bending your elbows early, your knees being too far forward, or no core activation; or b) not completely active— allowing your hips to rise prior to the bar leaving the ground, which may cause you to lean forward. Whether it’s weight distribution to the toes or fast hips shooting up, any forward movement at this stage of the lift throws you off course– making you jump forward even if the rest of your technique is spot on.

Corrections & Cues

  • Drive your heels into the floor when picking up the bar. Though you can set up on mid-foot, once you start lifting do not lean back—keep your weight on your heels.
  • Remember to move your hips at the same time as you move the bar. Your hips shooting up faster will cause you to lean forward.
  • Keep your chest up as you lift and focus on a spot right in front or slightly above your line of sight, to ensure you stay on your heels.

2. During the transition, because you are: shifting your hips too far into the bar; or simply shifting your weight to your toes too early during the transition, therefore having to jump forward to catch the bar. Remember, the bar must come back into your body, not your body into the bar.

Corrections & Cues

  • Practice hang snatches—specifically mid-hang (above knee) and high-hang (mid quadriceps). Starting from the hang will force you to use proper mechanics.
  • Practice romanian deadlifts to work the posterior chain and focus on proper heel distribution at a slower pace than that of the snatch.
  • Have a coach cue you to delay your jump (triple extension aka 2nd pull) and to be patient during your transition. Don’t rush. Trust the movement.

3. During the 2nd pull, because you are: not keeping the bar close to your body. You keep control of the bar the closer to you it is. If the bar hits your hips the contact should be up not out.

Corrections & Cues

  • Practice the power position snatch—it’s fastest way to fix this mistake. You’ll find it nearly impossible to do this lift right if you are letting the bar out too far.
  • You can also try dip snatches and high pulls.
  • Have a coach cue to you to remain vertical, to aim for your chin and to use more leg drive rather than hips. Less hips, more legs.

Mistake #2: Bending your arms
During the snatch, bending your arms too soon can result in a loss of power. Some tension and slight bending of the arm is okay if you keep that bend all the way into the receiving position. The wrong type of ‘arm bending’ is when you straighten your arms during the jump, and bend them a second time. This bend, straighten, then re-bend is what causes a loss of velocity. Either the bar will slow down or you will develop a hitch at the hips and stop.

Continue reading…


CF WOD April 7

Strength: Front Squat 5-5-5

WOD: “Tabata Twist” – finish as quickly as possible using tabata intervals
30 KB Swings (1.5/1)
30 Dynamic Push-ups
30 Jumping Squats
30 Ring Rows
30 Wall Balls (20/14)
30 Burpees
30 Abmat Sit-ups
30 Jumping Lunges (sub lunge steps)


0407This is my new favorite article. The 12 New Rules of Fitness. This lays it out pretty nicely. The basics. Supplements, Vitamins, Sleep, Diet, Intensity, Rest, Hydration, Specificity, Age and Salt: it’s all here. Carve a few minutes to read this puppy.[hr]

Monday@Met> WoD 1: 50-40-30-20-10 Lunges with 10-20-30-40-50 Sit Ups. WoD 2: “Invisible Fran” 21-15-9 of Squats and Push Ups. WoD 3: Suicides. **PLUS Plank.


BC 4/8

Tuesday> WoD: For 15 minutes, alternate 1 min Jump Rope and 30 sec Burpees. Finish with 8 Stair Runs.


CF Blog April 8

Strength: Deadlift 5-3-3-1-1photo-23

WOD:
3 Rounds
15 Pull-ups
10 Box Jumps (24/20)
5 HSPU
10 Back Extensions
1 Rope Climb
400m Run

***

If you want a good laugh, click the picture
15WD_eREgaTsWY3uerfVCndQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***

Ultimate Crossfit  

Buddy/Mentor Program

We are looking for a few good Mentors to provide support, guidance, and assistance to our recent Foundations Program Graduates. 
The idea is to provide a smooth transition for our newest members from the smaller Foundations classes into the bigger group classes. 
Think of it as a kind of “show you the ropes” role. 
We will pair you with somebody based on when you workout. 

If you are interested in being a buddy to our new additions, or if you are interested in having a buddy at the gym to help you get started please contact tricia@ultimatecrossfit.com with your name and time of day that you workout.


CF WOD April 8

Strength: Deadlift 5-3-3-1-1

WOD:
3 Rounds
15 Pull-ups
10 Box Jumps (24/20)
5 HSPU
10 Back Extensions
1 Rope Climb
400m Run


0408Here are some (harmful) ingredients that are commonly found in beer:

  • GMO Corn Syrup
  • GMO Corn
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup
  • Fish Bladder
  • Propylene Glycol
  • Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
  • Natural Flavors
  • GMO Sugars
  • Caramel Coloring
  • Insect-Based Dyes
  • Carrageenan
  • BPA

Mmmm… beer. Some are worse than others.[hr]

Tuesday> WoD: For 15 minutes, alternate 1 min Jump Rope and 30 sec Burpees. Finish with 8 Stair Runs, rest over back side of hill.


BC 4/9

Wednesday> Stability: 5×5 Plank Walk-outs with Push Up. Power: Over-the-Head Slam Ball Throw – 100yards. WoD: 4mins Max Rep Ball Slams – Goal is 100 – 1min rest, then, 2 Extreme Jacks per penalty rep.


4.9.14: Rolling Hills

uphill_kids

4.9.14: The Pit @ 6am

WOD:
Prowler Push: 5x :30 on/:30 off
Walk to hill with KB’s (1.5/1)
Hills: 10x Sprints
Walk back with KB’s (1.5/1)
Then, 1 Mile Run

We are going non-stop (but there will be time to rest and breath). This type of workout can push you as much as you push yourself. We’re teaching ourselves to run when we’re tired, to push through that feeling, and see that you’re more than capable of still going fast.

The sprints should be strong and fast but not all out. Save some for the mile. The mile should be the part where you push as hard as you can.


CF Blog April 9

Strength: Push Press 3-3-3-1-1photo-24

WOD:
AMRAP 15
300m Row
10 Power Cleans (95/65)
10 Front Squats (95/65)
10 Push Press (95/65)
10 Floor Wipers (95/65)
10 Lateral Burpees (Over the Bar)

POST WOD: Stretch/Foam Roll

***

THE INTRO

Hi, I’m Ryan from Gold Medal Bodies.

Anthony, being the super cool guy he is, asked me to give you guys a nice starting program for hitting handstands. For those of you who don’t know me, I have a thing for being upside down and helping people get strong with various gymnastic type movements.

Anthony and I were talking about training, and when he asked if I could share some tips about handstand work, I was pumped! I love handstands and all the benefits you get from practicing them.

Besides the fact that handstands make a great party trick, they’re a great start towards more difficult inverted and hand balancing maneuvers.

So what’s so great about handstands?

Well, when you do them right, handstands strengthen pretty much every muscle you have. Obviously, your shoulders and arms will get much stronger in overhead activities, and you’ll also notice some great improvements in your core strength. The strength and balance you get from doing handstands transfers over to a lot of other physical activities.

And let’s face it, being able to pop into a handstand wherever you are is pretty damn cool.

Now, I know what some of you are probably thinking.  “I can’t do that! I’ll break my head!” Handstands can be intimidating since there is always the possibility of crashing.

But, I promise, if you follow the progressions that I’m sharing with you today, you’ll get there as safely and as quickly as possible.  There is no reason why you shouldn’t get the handstand, or even make your current handstand better than it already is.

4 Basic Steps to Handstand Mastery

When I teach my clients to do a handstand, I generally take them through the following four stages:

  • Facing the wall
  • Facing away from the wall
  • L-Handstand using a wall
  • Freestanding Handstand work

But before you dive in and start taunting gravity, there are two things that you have to do to get ready for safe and productive handstand work—strengthen your wrists and ingrain the “hollow body” position.

Preparing Your Wrists

First we’ll start with wrist prep. If your wrists are weak, your handstand will be weak.

This is also one of the most common complaints I receive from people that have tried working on handstands and other handbalancing in the past. They just can’t carry weight properly on their hands.

That’s why we really need to focus on strengthening our wrists using the three variations below.

Fingers Forward

The first is with our hands flat and fingers facing forward. Make sure to keep your arms straight. Rock forward and bring your shoulders past your fingers and hold for 3 seconds. Relax, then repeat for a total of 5 reps.

Fingers Backward

Next we’ll take our fingers backwards and sit back, holding for 3 seconds for 5 reps. Don’t let the heels of your hands come up off of the ground.

Palms Up, Fingers Backward

For the final wrist prep, turn your hands over with palms facing up.  Keep your fingers facing your knees and sit back, holding for 3 seconds for a total of 5 reps.  If you have trouble keeping your arms straight, move your hands closer to your knees.

 Continue Reading…


CF WOD March 9

Strength: Push Press 3-3-3-1-1

WOD:
AMRAP 15
300m Row
10 Power Cleans (95/65)
10 Front Squats (95/65)
10 Push Press (95/65)
10 Floor Wipers (95/65)
10 Lateral Burpees (Over the Bar)

POST WOD: Stretch/Foam Roll


JLWhen I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.

~ John Lennon[hr]

Wednesday> Stability: 5×5 Plank Walk-outs with Push Up. Power: Over-the-Head Slam Ball Throw – 100yards. WoD: 4mins Max Rep Ball Slams – Goal is 100 – 1min rest, then, 2 Extreme Jacks per penalty rep.


BC 4/10

Thursday> WoD 1: AMRAP 5 of: partner 1 does 10 boxer sit ups / partner 2 holds plank *score is total rounds/reps. WoD 2:, AMRAP 5 of: partner 1 max row boats / partner 2 sprints *score is total row boats. Then 800m Run TT. Then repeat first AMRAPs for 2.5 minutes with goal of attaining half rounds/reps.


CF Blog April 10

Strength/Skill: Goat Work 15 minutesphoto-25

WOD:
3 Rounds
100 Jump Rope Singles
10 Renegade Rows (45/30)
10 Toes 2 Bar
15 KB Swings (2/1.5)
300m Row

***

Coming soon to Ultimate Crossfit…

the Functional Movement Screen

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed by Gray Cook and Lee Burton to screen athletes for mobility, motor control and/or stability issues. The following organizations are currently using the screen to help assess professional athletes’ risk for injury: NFL, PGA, NBA, NCAA, & MLB.

The goal of the screen is to reduce compensation and decrease injury risk, by targeting an athlete’s faulty movement patterns and reducing compensations that have been created through dysfunctional training. The screen is made up of 7 exercises, looking at how your body moves as a whole. The results of the screen will then help us develop an individualized program of corrective exercises for you to help work on any weaknesses or imbalances that you may have.

If you continue to train with dysfunctional movement (i.e. weakness, imbalances, mobility issues, etc.), you will be training in a dysfunctional manner, which will put you at risk for injury and decrease your ability to workout at your highest potential.

More information on our FMS Pilot Program will be coming soon. Be sure to check the website for updates. If this is something that you are interested in please email mike@ultimatecrossfit.com

CF WOD April 10

Strength/Skill: Goat Work 15 minutes

WOD:
3 Rounds
100 Jump Rope Singles
10 Renegade Rows (45/30)
10 Toes 2 Bar
15 KB Swings (2/1.5)
300m Row


0410Randomnosities from around the e-world:

7 Habits of SEALs // Business Insider

On Sexism // UpWorthy

The Human Experience // Distractify

How white are you? // BuzzFeed

Are you truly happy? // Elephant Journal

Former NE Patriot Tedy Bruschi runs the Boston Marathon // Runners World

This watch // Garmin

Cardio, according to weightlifters // Catalyst Athletics

Food Quality // John Bartemus, via modpaleo

Beef prices up // Outside Online

Memorial Day trail race at USNWC // USNWC

Be More Attractive // Business Insider

Stunting Tree Growth in CLT // Charlotte Observer

#1 ingredient I DON’t want in my face wash // UpWorthy

Facebook does not like small business, IMO.

Next Wednesday will be a fun workout. Be sure you’re there.[hr]

Thursday> WoD 1: AMRAP 5 of: partner 1 does 10 boxer sit ups / partner 2 holds plank *score is total rounds/reps. WoD 2:, AMRAP 5 of: partner 1 max row boats / partner 2 sprints *score is total row boats. Then 800m Run TT. Then repeat first AMRAPs for 2.5 minutes with goal of attaining half rounds/reps.


CF Blog April 11

Strength: Snatch OTM for 10 minutesphoto-26

WOD:
Start w/400m OH Plate Walk (45/25) – use old thick plates

then 3 Rounds of
20 Ball Slams (30/20)
20 Double Unders
20 Wall Balls (20/14)

Finish w/400m OH Plate Walk (45/25)

POST WOD: Stretch/Foam Roll

***

Coming soon to Ultimate Crossfit…

the Functional Movement Screen

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed by Gray Cook and Lee Burton to screen athletes for mobility, motor control and/or stability issues. The following organizations are currently using the screen to help assess professional athletes’ risk for injury: NFL, PGA, NBA, NCAA, & MLB.
The goal of the screen is to reduce compensation and decrease injury risk, by targeting an athlete’s faulty movement patterns and reducing compensations that have been created through dysfunctional training. The screen is made up of 7 exercises, looking at how your body moves as a whole. The results of the screen will then help us develop an individualized program of corrective exercises for you to help work on any weaknesses or imbalances that you may have.If you continue to train with dysfunctional movement (i.e. weakness, imbalances, mobility issues, etc.), you will be training in a dysfunctional manner, which will put you at risk for injury and decrease your ability to workout at your highest potential.

More information on our FMS Pilot Program will be coming soon. Be sure to check the website for updates. If this is something that you are interested in please email mike@ultimatecrossfit.com

***

Ultimate Crossfit  

Buddy/Mentor Program

We are looking for a few good Mentors to provide support, guidance, and assistance to our recent Foundations Program Graduates. 
The idea is to provide a smooth transition for our newest members from the smaller Foundations classes into the bigger group classes. 
Think of it as a kind of “show you the ropes” role. 
We will pair you with somebody based on when you workout. 

If you are interested in being a buddy to our new additions, or if you are interested in having a buddy at the gym to help you get started please contact tricia@ultimatecrossfit.com with your name and time of day that you workout.

 


CF WOD April 11

Strength: Snatch OTM for 10 minutes

WOD:
Start w/400m OH Plate Walk (45/25) – use old thick plates

then 3 Rounds of
20 Ball Slams (30/20)
20 Double Unders
20 Wall Balls (20/14)

Finish w/400m OH Plate Walk (45/25)

POST WOD: Stretch/Foam Roll


BC 4/11

Friday> WoD: 10 Rounds of 10 Broad Jumps, 10 Extreme Jacks, 10 Yard Sales, 10 Super Stars, Run Backwards to Start. Finish w/ short group run.


photoMake sure you come out next Wednesday. It’s gonna be a good one…

The above video demonstrates one reason we prefer functional movements.

The pic is of some familiar faces from last week’s Cooper River Bridge Run. Allyson was there, too. Good times. Get outs this weekend and enjoy some activity and Vit D. (one option is to hit up Endurance class at AG Middle School track Saturday@9:30AM)

To our new friends who have recently joined us, and those just re-joining us, don’t forget about DOMS. It’s real. It happens. Here’s more.[hr]

Friday> WoD: 10 Rounds of 10 Broad Jumps, 10 Extreme Jacks, 10 Yard Sales, 10 Super Stars, Run Backwards to Start. Finish w/ short group run.


4.12.14: Fast Track

Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 9.17.37 PM

4.12.14: AG Track @ 9:30am

WOD:
Run 1200m (rest 1:00)
Run 400m (rest 2:00)
Run 1200m (rest 1:00)
Run 400m (rest 2:00) –

Back in action on the track. We’re mixing up some long with some short. The 1200’s and 400’s should be run at the same pace. Goal pace is to maintain what your mile race pace would be.

Click on the pic above and it takes you to a video of Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce training with the Jamaican men.


CF Blog April 12

IMG_7551Kyle representing UCF at the fights. From L to R – Steve Hall, Kurtis Cloward, Cory Von Egidy, Kyle Harrell (Boxing with Kyle)

WOD: “Broken Angie”
10 Rounds
10 Pull-ups
10 Push-ups
10 Sit-ups
10 Air Squats

Finish w/800m Run – score is total time including Run


CF WOD April 12

WOD: “Broken Angie”
10 Rounds
10 Pull-ups
10 Push-ups
10 Sit-ups
10 Air Squats

Finish w/800m Run – score is total time including Run


CF Blog April 13

WOD: “Partner WOD”photo-27
400m Med Ball Run (20/14) – switch at the 200 turnaround
100 Ball Slams (30/20)
50 KB Snatches (1.5/1)
100 Lunge Steps
50 Med Ball Throws (20/14)
100 Double Unders
400m Med Ball Run (20/14) – switch at the 200 turnaround


CF WOD April 13

WOD: “Partner WOD”
400m Med Ball Run (20/14) – switch at the 200 turnaround
100 Ball Slams (30/20)
50 KB Snatches (1.5/1)
100 Lunge Steps
50 Med Ball Throws (20/14)
100 Double Unders
400m Med Ball Run (20/14) – switch at the 200 turnaround


BC 4/14

Monday@Met> WoD: AMRAP20 of 30 Squats + 15 Push Ups + 200m Run + 30 Step Ups + 15 Dips, 200m Run.


4.14.14: Perfect Pose

michael-johnson-running

4.14.14: AG Track @ 6pm

WOD
5x 200m (100m walk/jog)
5x 100m (100m walk/jog)

Goal is speed. We’re starting with the 200’s to get the body nice and prepped for the 100’s. With that said, the 200’s should still be run strong and hard. Keep the pace consistent and work on negative splits…getting faster with each one. Same goes for the 100m’s. Try to beat your prior time.

Pic: Michael Johnson has the perfect pose position for running. Absolute poetry in motion.


CF Blog April 14

Strength: Back Squat 5-5-5-5-5photo-28

WOD:
AMRAP 10
3 Man-Makers (35/25)
12 K2E

*Man-Maker is (pushup, row, pushup, row, squat clean thruster,
lunge, lunge)

***

Momma’s Quote of the Week:  “Confidence comes from discipline and training.”—Robert Kiyosaki

***

Interesting read from motherjones.com:

How the industry kept scientists from asking: Does sugar kill?

—By  and 

Chris BuzelliIllustration: ChrisBuzelli

ON A BRISK SPRING Tuesday in 1976, a pair of executives from the Sugar Association stepped up to the podium of a Chicago ballroom to accept the Oscar of the public relations world, the Silver Anvil award for excellence in “the forging of public opinion.” The trade group had recently pulled off one of the greatest turnarounds in PR history. For nearly a decade, the sugar industry had been buffeted by crisis after crisis as the media and the public soured on sugar and scientists began to view it as a likely cause of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Industry ads claiming that eating sugar helped you lose weight had been called out by the Federal Trade Commission, and the Food and Drug Administration had launched a review of whether sugar was even safe to eat. Consumption had declined 12 percent in just two years, and producers could see where that trend might lead. As John “JW” Tatem Jr. and Jack O’Connell Jr., the Sugar Association’s president and director of public relations, posed that day with their trophies, their smiles only hinted at the coup they’d just pulled off.

Their winning campaign, crafted with the help of the prestigious public relations firm Carl Byoir & Associates, had been prompted by a poll showing that consumers had come to see sugar as fattening, and that most doctors suspected it might exacerbate, if not cause, heart disease and diabetes. With an initial annual budget of nearly $800,000 ($3.4 million today) collected from the makers of Dixie Crystals, Domino, C&H, Great Western, and other sugar brands, the association recruited a stable of medical and nutritional professionals to allay the public’s fears, brought snack and beverage companies into the fold, and bankrolled scientific papers that contributed to a “highly supportive” FDA ruling, which, the Silver Anvil application boasted, made it “unlikely that sugar will be subject to legislative restriction in coming years.”

The story of sugar, as Tatem told it, was one of a harmless product under attack by “opportunists dedicated to exploiting the consuming public.” Over the subsequent decades, it would be transformed from what the New York Times in 1977 had deemed “a villain in disguise” into a nutrient so seemingly innocuous that even the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association approved it as part of a healthy diet. Research on the suspected links between sugar and chronic disease largely ground to a halt by the late 1980s, and scientists came to view such pursuits as a career dead end. So effective were the Sugar Association’s efforts that, to this day, no consensus exists about sugar’s potential dangers. The industry’s PR campaign corresponded roughly with a significant rise in Americans’ consumption of “caloric sweeteners,” including table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). This increase was accompanied, in turn, by a surge in the chronic diseases increasingly linked to sugar. Since 1970, obesity rates in the United States have more than doubled, while the incidence of diabetes has more than tripled. (The chart below uses sugar “availability” numbers rather than the USDA’s speculative new consumption figures.)

Continue reading…

 


CF WOD April 14

Strength: Back Squat 5-5-5-5-5

WOD:
AMRAP 10
3 Man-Makers (35/25)
12 K2E

*Man-Maker is (pushup, row, pushup, row, squat clean thruster,
lunge, lunge)


0414 copyFirst of all, a hearty Congratulations are in order for Madeline – she PR’d her 10K time this weekend at Charlotte RaceFest! Congrats, Madeline!

Second of all, a(nother) big Congratulations to Bryan for winning the April BC Challenge. Bryan took first place today over Shannon with a 28-20 (Burpee) victory. *Full Bracket Below* Congrats to all Challenge participants and keep planking.

What about coffee? Is it good for you? This article in Men’s Health supports caffeine, discussing it’s benefits to health and intelligence. *Note: we’re talking about caffeine in a pure form. Coke, Pepsi and the sugary drinks do not count. That’s just sugar.

“…caffeine raises blood pressure, but habitual coffee drinkers are half as likely to die of heart failure as those who don’t fill their mug daily. And while caffeine spikes blood sugar, a java habit may help you dodge diabetes.”

So, get’cha some coffee. Just keep it in check. What about that Bulletproof Coffee I hear so much about it?

Make sure you get out to BC Wednesday morning! You won’t wanna miss it…[hr]

Monday@Met> WoD: AMRAP20 of 30 Squats + 15 Push Ups + 200m Run + 30 Step Ups + 15 Dips, 200m Run.[hr]Bracket3


BC 4/15

Tuesday@Pit> Skill: Rolls. WoD1: 1 min. each for 3 Rounds… Battle Ropes / Box Jumps / Knees-to-Elbows / Man Makers. ~Rest 2 minutes~ WoD2: 21-15-9 OHWL  + Russian Twists + 1 Rope Climb.


CF Blog April 15

Strength: TGU 3-3-3-3 (each side)photo-29

Warmup DT movements after TGU

WOD:
Partner DT
10 rounds
9 DL (155/105)
7 Hang Power Clean
5 Jerks
You do a round, then partner does a round.

***

Great article from T Nation about CrossFit:

In Defense of CrossFit

by Chris Shugart

Crossfit

 

Here’s what you need to know…

•  Even with its questionable programming, often under-trained coaches and loudmouthed leader, CrossFit has greatly improved the field of fitness.

•  CrossFit has helped grow every aspect of the fitness industry, from training equipment and gym ownership to workout apparel and book sales. That’s good for all of us who love training.

•  Women, once turned off by images of steroidal female bodybuilders, are now embracing free-weight training in droves, largely thanks to CrossFit.

•  The CrossFit Games is fun to watch, and because of that, CrossFit, despite its flaws, is here to stay.

 I Invented CrossFit

Around the year 1995, I came up with the idea of CrossFit. I just forgot to name it and build a brand around it. Every Sunday I’d meet my training partners at Chuck’s house. Chuck had a big garage and all sorts of dangerous toys for us to play with. We had farmer’s walk implements made out of old railroad tracks, tires to drag, sandbags, med balls, kettlebells before kettlebells were really a “thing”, and a slew of old Olympic lifting gear.

The idea was this: we’d randomly come up with a workout of the day with the main focus being on conditioning, plus we’d do all those uncommon lifts we couldn’t do in our weekday commercial gyms. We’d do some type of Olympic lift, immediately go for a farmer’s walk, then do bodyweight squats and take a run around Chuck’s back field. Sometimes we’d compete and do this against the clock for time. I even published some articles about this stuff in the late 90s.

CrossFit wasn’t founded until the year 2000. So, Mr. Glassman, where’s my Reebok money? Where’s my 50% cut of all that cash you make printing reams of certifications? Can I at least hang out with Rich Froning? Because he seems like a standup guy.

No, I’m kidding. Greg Glassman deserves all the credit. He took a bunch of training ideas that had been around for decades, combined them into one modality, established the defining principles, hurled a few lawsuits and threats when needed, and worked hard until CrossFit blew up. Good for him. He tapped into his gymnastics background, renamed circuit training, and made it his own. That takes a lot of smarts, a little luck, and a single-minded sense of purpose that only the very determined and/or the bug-shit crazy possess.

But as a “co-inventor” of CrossFit (along with Dan John, Herschel Walker, my 7th grade football coach, the Muscle Beach crowd in the 1930’s, and dozens of others), I’ve been able to follow its development closer than most people. I wrote the first article about it for T Nation in 2008. I’ve actually traded a phone call or two with Glassman, and I work with several coaches who’ve been on the inside of CrossFit, at least before they removed themselves from its inner workings (often fleeing in disgust if truth be told.) So what’s the verdict on CrossFit? Well, as painful as it is to say, CrossFit is pretty awesome.

Thank God for CrossFit

It’s easy to bash CrossFit. The dubious programming and exercise order of the WODs, the butterfly kipping pull-up abortion, the sometimes under-trained “coaches”, the sloppy form, the fact that Glassman has very, very strong opinions about how to perform certain lifts even though he’s not able to do them himself and (some have surmised) has never actually done them… Yeah, all that is low hanging fruit. And past T Nation articles have covered these drawbacks in depth. But the truth is that CrossFit has done us all a world of good. And thank God for it.

Newbies Keep the Market Alive

Back in college I worked at a knife store. Being an aficionado of high quality edged weaponry, I complained to my boss about the “knife newbies” who’d come into the store only interested in the cheap movie-knife replicas, like knockoff Rambo bowies. Ray took me aside and explained to me that those crappy knives were the best thing that ever happened to the knife business. They attracted new people and brought them into the store for the first time. “Sell them what they want,” he told me. “Later, we’ll introduce them to the really good stuff. Let those junky replica knives bring them through the door and we’ll teach them about quality blades when they’re ready.”

Do you see the analogy here? CrossFit has pulled people into fitness and hardcore lifting that would’ve otherwise never walked through that door. Some people were never turned on by bodybuilding and, since they weren’t competitive athletes, they weren’t drawn to performance training either. CrossFit filled a void: lose fat, build some muscle, and look and feel more athletic… no shaving your ass and standing on stage required. No spending hours and hours a week preparing for marathons, one of the few challenging sports widely available to weekend warriors.

When one area of fitness does well, other segments of the industry do well too. CrossFit created new consumers of gym apparel, sports supplements, and workout equipment. Jobs were created, not because the government passed some backhanded bill, but because the demand occurred organically.

Coaches from narrower fields, like pure barbell strength training, Olympic lifting, gymnastics, and mobility, were suddenly filling up their seminar schedules and selling more books. Physical therapists, chiropractors, orthopedic surgeons, and soft tissue specialists saw a rise in business. That’s partly due to the fact that thousands of new people were exercising hard. And yes, it’s also partly due to the fact that more people were hurting themselves with questionable WODS and competitions.

Savvy equipment makers created new products to sell to the 9,000-plus new “boxes” cropping up all over the world. T-shirt makers threw the words “WOD” and “snatch” onto their shirts and sold out. The Olympic lifting shoe market, once less profitable than the hacky-sack shoe market, was suddenly having to ramp up production. Barbell makers profited. Kinesiology tape makers prospered. Owners of commercial warehouse spaces were filling their leases. The gymnastics market boomed as practically overnight everyday fitness enthusiasts wanted a set of rings in their garage. Thousands of people began to push their bodies to the limit and realized they needed a better diet and better supplements to fuel their performance and recovery.

Just as those Crocodile Dundee knife replicas grew the knife business, CrossFit was growing every part of the fitness industry. And if you like to train, this is good, even if you don’t do CrossFit. You have more choices now, better products competing for your dollar, and maybe even your standard commercial gym – feeling the hurt of losing members to CrossFit boxes – added lifting platforms, heavier kettlebells, pull-up bars, good rowing machines, and better med balls. Gyms got better because they had to get better. Competition, customer service, and capitalism… for the win.

Hardcore Mass Appeal

CrossFit boxes weren’t “gym gyms” either. These weren’t ridiculous group fitness classes full of bad Columbian dancing and faux martial arts. Compared to that pablum, CrossFit was hardcore-looking stuff. It pulled the housewives out of Zumba and Combat Yoga because of the simple fact that it didn’t look so house-wifey. It put barbells into the soft hands of people who hadn’t touched one since high school. It was brutally hard, but still looked fun, and it still incorporated the best elements of group fitness by creating a sense of community and compliance.

Also, CrossFit brought many retired high school and college athletes back into fitness. CrossFit is competitive, and though timing every workout or shooting for more reps or load for time has its drawbacks, it also has a very wide appeal, especially to former athletes. It gave them a new “sport” where they could compare themselves to others and set PRs. Humans will, after all, compete in anything (see competitive cheerleading and lawnmower racing), and CrossFit tapped into this natural instinct in a way that reached out to athletes, couch potatoes, and weekend warriors. North America is less fat because of it.

CrossFit Works

Let’s rephrase that. Weight training works. Metabolic conditioning works. Olympic lifting works. Training hard works. Cleaning up your shitty diet works. These things have always worked and CrossFit uses them all and provides an atmosphere that pushes you to push yourself. And a lot of people need that.

In the early days of CrossFit, the joke was that CrossFit makes women hot and men small. The first part of that statement is definitely true, not because CrossFit is magically effective for female physiology, but because it gave women “permission” to lift hard and heavy, something that bodybuilding largely failed to do.

Sure, bodybuilding for women has always been around, but steroid usage and images of man-faced females did a lot of damage. This is where all the myths originated, like “lifting makes women big and manly.” It didn’t matter how hard we on the hypertrophy side of fitness tried to dispel these myths. One image of Kim Chizevsky from the 1990s dissuaded more women from hitting the iron than we could have ever hoped to convince otherwise, though we sure tried. Where bodybuilding, Olympic lifting, and powerlifting failed to recruit women, CrossFit succeeded. In fact, it kicked our asses.

The imagery and social media presence of CrossFit did what traditional resistance training could not. At the very least, it helped shift the tide. (Figure and bikini divisions of physique contests played a role here too.) CrossFit girls – women who lift weights, do metcon, and train aggressively, largely without using steroids and other drugs – are sexy. They aren’t posing and flexing, they’re performing, and generally looking damn good doing it, at least at the higher levels. Women who would never call themselves bodybuilders, or even Figure athletes, wanted to look like the prototypically memed CrossFit girl: lean, tough, super fit, athletic and with enough muscle to look very “toned” in the words of the general public, without looking “manly.” It wasn’t okay to be a bodybuilder in many women’s mind, but it was more than okay to be an athlete. Annie Thorisdottir, two-time CrossFit Games winner, was featured in Vogue magazine. A strong woman in an anorexic fashion mag? Game, set, and match.

 Continue reading…


CF WOD April 15

Strength: TGU 3-3-3-3 (each side)

Warmup DT movements after TGU

WOD:
Partner DT
10 rounds
9 DL (155/105)
7 Hang Power Clean
5 Jerks
You do a round, then partner does a round.


Confession. I set these blogs in advance most of the time. So, please forgive the timing of this post, since we’re actually inside today.

0415Ahem.

The Benefits of Workout Out Outside. Not only is it physically better for you to be outside in nature, grounded in the earth and breathing unadulterated air (save for the occasional landscaping crew rolling by at Oh: Dark: Thirty, than tripping incessantly over your feet on a treadmill, it’s actually better for your mental health too! Here are a few of the highlighted items from this article.

  • Improved attention and focus
  • Greater likelihood to keep exercising
  • Lower risk of being overweight
  • More energy
  • Faster healing and less pain
  • Higher Vitamin D levels

The New York Times concurs. As does other science. And… Self magazine.

See ya back outside tomorrow. Make sure you’re there…[hr]

Tuesday@Pit> Skill: Rolls. WoD1: 1 min. each for 3 Rounds… Battle Ropes / Box Jumps / Knees-to-Elbows / Man Makers. ~Rest 2 minutes~ WoD2: 21-15-9 OHWL  + Russian Twists + 1 Rope Climb.


4.16.14: Short Power

11smr06

4.16.14: The Pit @ 6am

WOD
Part 1: Prowler Races
10:00 of Racing (distance increases with each round)

Part 2: Short Sprints
10x 50m (mix of front, back, side, karaoke)
– rest is 50m jog/walk

Part 3: Run AFAP in Time Remaining
With what time we have left in class, you will run as far as you can within that time.

 

NOTE: no class this Saturday. Try to find a nice trail and hit a 5k or 10k run. Don’t worry about time. Just do it for the pure enjoyment of being outside.


BC 4/16

Wednesday@Pit> Strength: TGU 5-5-5-5-5. WoD: 5 Rounds – 150m Sprint + 5 Man Makers.


CF Blog April 16

Skill: MU/Bar MU

JoshJosh

WOD:
Start with 800m Run
Then…
2 rounds
50 air squats
25 abmat situps
25 back extensions
50 DU

Finish with 1000m Row

***

Coming soon to Ultimate Crossfit…

the Functional Movement Screen

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed by Gray Cook and Lee Burton to screen athletes for mobility, motor control and/or stability issues. The following organizations are currently using the screen to help assess professional athletes’ risk for injury: NFL, PGA, NBA, NCAA, & MLB.
The goal of the screen is to reduce compensation and decrease injury risk, by targeting an athlete’s faulty movement patterns and reducing compensations that have been created through dysfunctional training. The screen is made up of 7 exercises, looking at how your body moves as a whole. The results of the screen will then help us develop an individualized program of corrective exercises for you to help work on any weaknesses or imbalances that you may have.If you continue to train with dysfunctional movement (i.e. weakness, imbalances, mobility issues, etc.), you will be training in a dysfunctional manner, which will put you at risk for injury and decrease your ability to workout at your highest potential.
More information on our FMS Pilot Program will be coming soon. Be sure to check the website for updates. If this is something that you are interested in please email mike@ultimatecrossfit.com

***

Ultimate Crossfit  

Buddy/Mentor Program

We are looking for a few good Mentors to provide support, guidance, and assistance to our recent Foundations Program Graduates. 
The idea is to provide a smooth transition for our newest members from the smaller Foundations classes into the bigger group classes. 
Think of it as a kind of “show you the ropes” role. 
We will pair you with somebody based on when you workout. 

If you are interested in being a buddy to our new additions, or if you are interested in having a buddy at the gym to help you get started please contact tricia@ultimatecrossfit.com with your name and time of day that you workout.

 


CF WOD April 16

Skill: MU/Bar MU

WOD:
Start with 800m Run
Then…
2 rounds
50 air squats
25 abmat situps
25 back extensions
50 DU

Finish with 1000m Row


0416There’s an ongoing battle in the running world about minimalist shoes. New Balance Minimus were all the rage for a while, running magazines were touting the POSE technique (also known by several other names), and the book Born To Run told us of an indigenous Mexican tribe that was the fastest group of humans on the planet… and they ran on some pieced-together sandal through the Copper Canyons at some unheard of speeds! Then, there was the backlash. “It’s not for everyone.” “You can’t undo the way you’ve run (in cushioned shoes) since you were born.” Haters continue hatin’. Then there’s this new opposite-of-minimalist shoe made by Hoka. They say you need, not only the cushion you’re relying on… but even more!

So, what’s a runner (or non-runner) to do? Who do you listen to? What’s best for your feet and running technique?

Here’s an article on how barefoot-ed-ness may effect the structure of your feet. Does using cushioned shoes actually damage your arch and other parts of your feet? Interesting read.

In the end, in my opinion, the shoe matches the (running) technique. Or… is it the technique that matches the shoe? Either way, I think you’re best to go to a running store and have them match your foot strike and technique to a shoe. And listen to your body, legs, knees, hips, etc. There’s certainly no one blanket answer, unfortunately. I do, however, tend to agree that the closer to the earth you are, the better off you are. Get your feet in the grass at some point, even if it’s not for puttin’ in your weekly miles.

Other thoughts?[hr]

Wednesday@Pit> Strength: TGU 5-5-5-5-5. WoD: 5 Rounds – 150m Sprint + 5 Man Makers.


BC 4/17

Thursday> Endurance: 400m Run Fwd / 200m Run Back + 5 Burpees every time you change direction.


CF Blog April 17

Strength: Halting DL 3-3-3-3 (60-70%)photo-31

WOD 1:
21-15-9
KB swings (2/1.5)
Burpees

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 2:
21-15-9
Pullups
Box Jump (30/24)

Trainer led foam roll

***

From BreakingMuscle.com (this is why we we keep quality, SFH protein in stock 😉 ):

10 Things I Know About Protein That You Don’t

Guest Contributor

I work in the supplement industry and have for the past decade. If you’re saying, “Big deal, me, too,” then you can stop reading right now. For the rest of you, I’m betting that I can tell you ten things about protein that you don’t know.

1. There’s No Such Thing as Undenatured Whey Protein

Here’s a fact: all whey protein sold in the United States needs to first be pasteurized. Even at the lowest temperature, that means subjecting the whey protein to a level of heat that will cause changes in some of the fractions. This doesn’t mean that the protein is useless or won’t give you all of the benefits you see touted in advertisements and studies. It just means that undenatured is a meaningless concept when we’re talking about whey protein sold legally in the United States. So unless you’re clued into the whey protein black market or some whey protein-selling crime syndicate, you’re not getting undenatured anything.

1.5. If Your Favorite Brand Sells Bioactive Peptides, Find a New Brand

Bioactive whey peptides are protein fractions that cause a measurable biological response in the body. Maybe it’s enhancing the immune system or increasing pumps (for teh gainz). Those peptides come from protein. They come from the protein you buy from that same company.

See, every pound of protein might sell for $5 at the manufacturer level, but it also might contain $10 worth of peptides in 1/10th of the weight. So they strip all of those awesome peptides out, thereby losing .50c from the protein itself, but in the process they earn double the money from the sale of the peptides they removed. You get the completely denatured protein (stripped of every biologically active peptide they could mine), and they sell you back the peptides in another product (or in the same product, claiming that they have “added peptides”).

2. Cold Filtered Whey Is Still Heated

“But my whey can’t be denatured from heat, it’s cold filtered,” I hear someone saying. That’s nice. But cold filtered is the actual filtering process that concentrates the whey into the final percentage of protein (typically +80%). The filtering has nothing to do with the fact that most manufacturers who “cold filter” their whey are still flash pasteurizing it at the highest possible temperature beforehand. Why? Because it only takes fifteen seconds to flash pasteurize whey and it takes fifteen minutes to pasteurize it at the lowest heat levels. So you can produce more whey if you only take 1/60th of the time at this stage of processing.

3. GMO/Grass-Fed Laws Are Stricter Overseas

Oh, so your whey comes from New Zealand, and you’re bragging about it being non-GMOand free range and all that good stuff? Guess what? All whey from New Zealand is going to be non-GMO and free range. Their laws are far stricter than the ones in the good ol’ United States, so it’s a bit redundant to talk about how great your New Zealand whey is when every gram of dairy the country produces is just as good. I lived in Auckland, New Zealand, and I’ve been to the dairy farms, and you’re from Maine, so you’re probably going to have to take my word on this one.

4. No Studies Ever Compared Grass-Fed Whey to Grain-Fed Dairy

Don’t get me wrong, I believe that grass-fed dairy (and beef for that matter) is superior to grain-fed. But there are no direct studies comparing them in athletes or in an exercising population. There is tons of evidence showing grass-fed animals (and their meat products) are healthier, but none on dairy in athletes. It makes a much bigger difference with meat, where the fat content can be radically altered by diet, or even with whole fat milk. But with a good whey protein, we’re talking about a gram of fat per serving. So while I still prefer grass-fed (everything), this is based more on inductive reasoning than hard and fast studies that examine these parameters in athletes.

5. A 100% Hydrolized Whey Protein Doesn’t Exist

I’ve seen studies that use thirty to forty percent hydrolyzed whey and spoken to the authors. It’s inedible. The reason for this is the fact that breaking down (hydrolyzing) protein is exactly what happens during the digestive process. Protein that has been 100% broken down will not stay together in any form (think about it, what would a slab of steak look like after your stomach has digested 100% of it – now imagine it as a powder). Those “100% Whey Protein Hydrolysate” jugs you see at the local nutrition chain are actually a lot lower. The “100%” claim comes from the fact that the entire jug contains hydrolyzed whey protein (no other types of protein or whey), and that protein itself has been hydrolyzed 2% (or 5% or whatever). So it’s all (100%) hydrolyzed – but only by a few percent.

6. Your Amino Acids Probably Come From Dead Kittens

Ok, I’m exaggerating – but not by much. The most popular form of amino acid production is through the chemical synthesis of keratin, which requires far fewer steps (and is therefore less costly) than other methods. Keratin is abundantly supplied in hair, nails, claws, and fur. Short of staking out every hair and nail salon in China (where most aminos are sourced), producers instead make them from animals whose pelts are not good enough to use for clothing. So maybe the pelt was damaged in the slaughter process or some other horrific industrial accident. That pelt is worthless as clothing, but can still be used to synthesize leucine (or whatever). I’d estimate 95% of manufacturers are using this process or a similar one, and I’m really good at estimating horrific, awful, stuff like this.

7. Twenty Grams of High-Quality Protein Is Usually Enough

Selling more protein makes the manufacturer more money, and having a huge protein-grams-per-serving count on the label helps them win fans in the bodybuilding community. But nearly every study that looks at a decent protein source, like egg or whey, usually concludes that the additional stimulation of myotropic (muscle building) or recovery factors isn’t greatly enhanced after twenty grams.

8. Worthless Aminos Are Often Substituted for Expensive Proteins

Within the industry this is known as protein spiking. Cheap aminos like glycine are used to pad the protein content of otherwise expensive whey. So if a pound of whey comes in at $6, and a pound of glycine is a $2, maybe two to three grams of the latter are put in the former. Since it’s an amino and not a whole protein, it’s providing those grams at a much lower cost, and doesn’t appear on the label as another protein form, thereby allowing the manufacturer to still (legally) claim “100% whey” or “100% casein.” I know of one brand that uses creatine (technically an amino) to spike their protein, which as a bonus is super-easy to flavor. Their protein is delicious. Now you know why.

9. Twenty Grams of Protein Usually Isn’t

Protein bars are notorious for under-dosing protein and overstating the amount on the label. This is a bit of an open secret in the industry, and although powders are better, they’re still under-dosed in a lot of cases. Naturally, the yummy carbs are the exact opposite – you’ll find far more in the bar than you see on the label.

9.1 Twenty Grams of Protein Usually Isn’t (Part Two)

Hydrolyzed collagen is technically protein. But it doesn’t build much muscle, and it has a biological value of virtually nil. I’m talking about the stuff we’ve been seeing in gels and goops for the past decade (allegedly, there are some recent forms that aren’t useless, however it’s unlikely that your favorite brand is using them). Gels are obviously the worst offender here, but those little protein shots are pretty bad also.

10. Most Protein Comes From the Same Place(s)

If you were to walk the aisles of your local supplement retailer, you’d see dozens of different brands of protein. But if you were to see the actual manufacturers of the protein itself (the people all of those brands are buying it from), you’d see far fewer companies. There are probably ten major players in the field of powdered protein, and that’s being generous. They’re not just huge; they own other companies that we think are huge.

Glanbia, for example, produces a lion’s share of the dairy products in Ireland. They’re a billion-dollar company, they own BSN as well as Optimum Nutrition, and they do contract manufacturing for tons of other companies, both big and small (well, medium). So, when you see Brand X Casein and the store house brand and BSN and ON, all sitting next to each other, there’s actually a good chance that the protein in the jugs is identical. And Glanbia is the manufacturer behind the most popular protein brand(s) in the CrossFit world, if we’re keeping score at home.

 


CF WOD April 17

Strength: Halting DL 3-3-3-3 (60-70%)

WOD 1:
21-15-9
KB swings
Burpees

Rest 3 minutes

WOD 2:
21-15-9
Pullups
Box Jump (30/24)

Trainer led foam roll


0417Ran. Do. M.

Beards are over // PolicyMic

Who are you really supporting // TakePart

Fed Up // Huffington Post

Local leather // etsy

Is Amazon Prime really all that? // Business Insider

Slow-Mo Parkour Dog // Devour

Fast Food Lasagna // YouTube

How “Frozen” should have ended // Huffington Post

Neolithic for $1000, please // TakePart

Police Beat // YouTube

Weather Phenomenon // BoredomBash

In Case ya Missed it // DrNick

Best and Worst Locavores // TakePart

Fargo for TV with Odenkirk // Guardian[hr]

Thursday> Endurance: 400m Run Fwd / 200m Run Back + 5 Burpees every time you change direction.


BC 4/18

Friday> @moga


CF Blog April 18

Strength:photo-32
Weighted Dips: 5-5-3-3
Weighted Pushups 10-8-6-4-2

WOD:
3 rounds
400m run
20 weighted walking lunge (35/25)
15 ring pushups
10 2 for 1 wallballs

***

A few of years after her first testimonial, here’s an update on Nancy Martin:

“Have you ever wondered what happened to that woman from the testimonials who talked about how great and supportive Lance, his trainers, and the other members of Ultimate Crossfit had been as she struggled with a herniated disc, discectomy, reherniation, re-discectomy, and then the struggle to try to come back to Crossfit (or any other upright activity?)  About how UCF’s emphasis seems to be so much more on members getting what they need than about the gym getting your money?

Well, here I am today.   I was down and out- truly miserable for about two years, with my core muscles not doing what they needed to do – before the intervention of a fabulous Physical Therapist up in Greensboro helped me.  Coupled with the ongoing support and encouragement and guidance of the UCF trainers and members,  I’m back. (no pun intended.)

I’d have to ask Mike to pull the records to figure out exactly how long it has been, but I think it has been over two years since I made my return.  I’d love to show you a body that is really different than the one in the testimonials photo, and it is, but just not as much as I’d like.  I came back about 40-50 lbs. over my normal weight, and I’m still at that same weight, but I assure you that my body mass index is much more favorable now.

One of my favorite shirts hanging in the gym is “don’t wish it was easier; Wish you were better.”
My thinking has evolved over the past two years.   Some humor was intended in that shirt, but I know everybody has WODs where they are unhappy with how they did when it is over.  Or when they have to stop.  And that is purely self-defeating negative thinking.

I finally realized that every time I come to the gym, and I participate in a WOD, I have succeeded.  Yes, I want to be better, stronger, faster, but I think it is important to put on the “reality” glasses (not to be confused with beer goggles) and truly consider what just happened in the past 40 minutes.

I so clearly remember not being able to do a single abmat situp when I came back.  Not one.  So I crunched.  High impact?  Not for me.  I row, row, rowed my boat for a good year plus.  I missed running, but I missed being able to be at the gym more, so the trade off was worth it.  I am usually at Liz or Neil coached classes, so we modified where necessary to avoid too much strain and risk of injury, and I did what I could.  Of course, I try to be the Queen of core posture, and I have the privilege of having time to stretch before and after class, especially those hamstrings.

Last year I participated in the Open.  I learned so much from doing it.  Of course, I wish I could compete at a level that would move on, but doesn’t everybody?  I had to embrace just being there.

My neurosurgeon told me that “running is the worst thing you can do to your body.”  I respect the hell out of his skills as a doctor, but I can’t totally agree with that.  I’m pleased to announce that this year, I’m able to do some high impact stuff.  I can run short distances.  I can jump a rope, I can burpee full out.  And ab mat sit ups?  I remember one WOD where I realized that I had done 75 across three rounds.  Not a bad increase from zero.

And those aren’t the only PRs I’ve had in recent months – my back squat PR is 205, my shoulder press 105.  I can’t remember the others, but I do know it’s a far cry from where I was years ago when I struggled  carrying in  groceries 1 to 2 bags at a time, or not being able to participate in Dog Rescue events because I couldn’t tolerate even the small ones pulling on a leash.

So while I’m not where I want to be just yet, I’m still a success story.  And while I probably do often wish it was easier, I know I am better.  And I truly believe that the Ultimate Crossfit Family is a gigantic part of why.  I desperately wanted to come back, and everybody at UCF supported me.  And I cannot thank everyone enough!  Everyone who comes and does what he/she can is a success!


CF WOD April 18

Strength:
Weighted Dips: 5-5-3-3
Weighted Pushups 10-8-6-4-2

WOD:
3 rounds
400m run
20 weighted walking lunge (35/25)
15 ring pushups
10 2 for 1 wallballs


0418As my buddy Schurman would say, “innaresting”…

Rumination is a term I think I’ve only heard my mom use until now. Check out this post on Robb Wolf’s blog on Racing thoughts and Rumination.

Rumination tends to take place when we are alone and not fully engaged in a task.  From an evolutionary standpoint we have not spent much time alone until recently.  Our ancestors hunted together, foraged together, ate together, played together, and slept together.  Today we have greater means to communicate with people throughout the world, but spend much more of our time alone and without any real world social interactions.

Rumination may be beneficial for 5 minutes, but prolonged ruminating can lead to cognitive decline, enhanced negative thinking, enhances depression, and it can negatively impair social support (http://pps.sagepub.com/content/3/5/400.abstract ).  If the lack of social interactions is an underlying piece of prolonged rumination and it leads to even less social interaction then we can get stuck in a hole of negative thinking that just grows deeper and deeper.

For those of you who struggle with sleep, this may be worth a quick read.

If you’d like to read more, check this one out.

Have a great weekend![hr]

Friday> @moga


CF Blog April 19

WOD:photo-33
Waiter walk 200m
Farmer walk 200m
200m run
3 Bear complex (95/65)
Waiter walk 100m
Farmer walk 100m
200m run
6 bear complex
Waiter walk 50m
Farmer walk 50m
200m run
9 bear complex
Waiter walk 25m
Farmer walk 25m
200m run
12 bear complex

***

Lots of love to Eric and Shannon as they tie the knot and make it official today!!!  Cheers to Mr. & Mrs. Silverfox – We love you guys!!!

 


CF WOD April 19

WOD:
Waiter walk 200m
Farmer walk 200m
200m run
3 Bear complex (95/65)
Waiter walk 100m
Farmer walk 100m
200m run
6 bear complex
Waiter walk 50m
Farmer walk 50m
200m run
9 bear complex
Waiter walk 25m
Farmer walk 25m
200m run
12 bear complex


CF Blog April 20 – Easter

Happy Easter!602O9PvLO1SV6Yz_evNKbb1g

WOD:
Saucy Little Bunny
3 rds
30 Pushups
30 Cal row
30 KB swings (2/1.5)

*Normal class schedule today!!


CF WOD April 20

Happy Easter!
WOD:
Saucy Little Bunny
3 rds
30 Pushups
30 Cal row
30 KB swings (2/1.5)


4.21.14: 4 Bills

DTRMNJZDNPTIOND.20120523220445

4.21.14: AG Track @ 6pm

WOD:
6x 400m Run
– rest 1:00

Throwing in everyone’s favorite, the 400. But we’re liming the rest time. Helps us build our endurance and speed at the same time. It also forces us to stay within ourselves on the run. The times should be consistent (within :03-:05) of each other. And you know I prefer negative splits when possible.


BC 4/21

Monday@Met> 4 Rounds of 15 Sit Ups + 26 Squats + 13 Burpees + 800m Run


CF Blog April 21

bostonmarathonbombingsanniversaryL

Strength: 15 minutes to establish a 3RM OHS

WOD: “Marathon Monday” (30 min cap)
5 Rounds
4 Clean and Jerks (185/125)
15 Pull-ups
13 Lateral Barbell Burpees
After 5 Rounds are complete:
800m Run

***

Momma’s Quote of the Week:  “The purpose of training is to tighten up the slack, toughen the body, and polish the spirit.”—Morihei Ueshiba

***

Today’s “Marathon Monday” WOD will be done in honor of those who died and were injured in last year’s Boston Marathon bombing.  As runners from across the globe take part in the 118th running of the Boston Marathon today, we pause to not only remember the tragic events of last year, but also to celebrate the resilience and strength of the Boston community as well as the outpouring of support and encouragement from across our nation. 

If you would like to  donate to One Fund Boston, you can do so here: https://onefundboston.org/


CF WOD April 21

Strength: 15 minutes to establish a 3RM OHS

WOD: “Marathon Monday” (30 min cap)
5 Rounds
4 Clean and Jerks (185/125)
15 Pull-ups
13 Lateral Barbell Burpees
After 5 Rounds are complete:
800m Run


0421Today we honor those who suffered in the 2013 Boston Marathon. And we celebrate those running, stronger than ever, in this year’s 118th Boston Marathon. Best of luck to all the runners, spectators and well-wishers.

4 Rounds – the month of the Boston Marathon, April
15 Sit Ups – the day of the bombing
26 Squats – miles in a marathon
13 Burpees – the Year of the bombing
800m Run – well, ya gotta run, right?

I think Big Papi said it best.

Boston Strong.[hr]

*If you would like to  donate to One Fund Boston, you can do so here: https://onefundboston.org/*

Monday@Met> 4 Rounds of 15 Sit Ups + 26 Squats + 13 Burpees + 800m Run

 


BC 4/22

Tuesday> “Fartlek”


CF Blog April 22

Strength: Bent Row 7-7-7photo-34

AMRAP 15
5 Dynamic Push-ups
10 Weighted Step-ups (35/20 dumbbells)*
15 Abmat Situps
25 Double Unders

*box height – put one foot up on box, thigh should be parallel to floor –
crease of hip at or slightly above the knee*

Post WOD: Group Stretch

***

From MindBodyGreen.com:

Why It’s So Hard To Quit Soda & Sugary Drinks (And What To Do About It)

BY AUSTIN PERLMUTTER
APRIL 20, 2014 4:30 AM EDT

As Americans, we’re becoming more health conscious, a change reflected in the creation of a $60 billion weight-loss industry. Generally, we seek to become healthier by changing our exercise patterns and modifying our foods. These are essential tools toward achieving a more healthful life, but we sometimes marginalize our beverage choices in the process.

Despite a decline in recent years, data shows we’re still buying roughly 9 billion cases of soda per year. Add that to the money we spend on juice, sports drinks, and other sweetened beverages, and the resulting health impact of our sugary drink choices is anything but trivial.

Let’s start with the facts. Soft drinks and other drinks sweetened by sugar are the top source of added sugar in the American diet. Over the last 50 years, we’ve seen a 500% increase in consumption of these beverages. More frighteningly, these drinks are the top source of calories in our pediatric population. Considering the studiesshowing that added sugar leads to weight gain in children and adults, as well as an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease, these drinks may well be sending us to an early grave.

But perhaps you already knew that soda was bad for your health? After all, very few people believe they’re staying healthy while downing a liter bottle of Coke. But you should also appreciate the fact that a glass of your favorite fruit juice or sports drink may actually contain more sugar than that soda you avoided, as well as more calories. For these sports beverages and fruit-based drinks, we’d like to tout the relative health benefits, assuming they outweigh the cost of a bit of extra sugar. Perhaps this is true in moderation, but take a quick glance at Harvard’s beverage comparison tool. Once you realize that your pure grape juice has 5 teaspoons more sugar, and nearly double the calories compared with your can of Coke, you may want to reconsider your selection.

I don’t mean to imply that all fruit juices and sports drinks are as bad as soda. Pomegranate juice is loaded with antioxidants, though it’s still high in sugar. Some sports drinks emphasize electrolytes over sweetener. That said, you’re better served eating your pomegranate, as the sugar would be partially offset by fiber in the skin of the fruit. And unless you’re a competitive athlete in training, most sports drinks contain far more sugar than you need. Reducing added sugar is the key, which eventually leads to a discussion on sugar alternatives.

Artificial sweeteners are a new, constantly evolving creation. With all the information on sugar consumption leading to obesity, most people choose these substitute agents to facilitate weight loss. Interestingly, researchshows that the opposite occurs, with drinkers of artificially sweetened beverages increasing their weightproportionate to the amount of beverages consumed. Aspartame, one of the most commonly used artificial sweeteners, may actually lead to increased calorie intake, completely defeating any weight loss goals.

At this point in the conversation, my patients generally narrow their eyes, accusing me of taking everything but water from their glasses. First, understand that the human body isn’t structured to handle the large doses of liquid sugar we consume in the form of juice, sports drinks or soda. While there are many unsweetened beverages like coffee and tea available, some of us have intense craving for sugary drinks, making regular beverages seem tasteless and bitter. In fact, scientists found that exposure to sweetened beverages actually makes sugary drinks taste better, increasing our preference for sweetened drinks over their unsweetened equivalents.

continue reading…


CF WOD April 22

Strength: Bent Row 7-7-7

AMRAP 15
5 Dynamic Push-ups
10 Weighted Step-ups (35/20 dumbbells)*
15 Abmat Situps
25 Double Unders

*box height – put one foot up on box, thigh should be parallel to floor –
crease of hip at or slightly above the knee*

Post WOD: Group Stretch


0422Today’s workout and today’s blog topic are so basic.

Is food on your mind? It should be. You come to bootcamp every day and get your sweaty shwerve on… you’re building this fit and healthy machine… how are you fueling this machine? What you put in your body has absolutely everything to do with your performance, be it at bootcamp, a Saturday 5k, your job, how you sleep…

A couple of the basics from Michael Pollan, food author recently featured on NPR:

1) Don’t eat anything your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.

2) Don’t eat anything with more than five ingredients, or ingredients you can’t pronounce.

3) Stay out of the middle of the supermarket. You should shop the perimeter of the store where you find the fruits, vegetables, and meats.

4) Don’t eat anything that won’t eventually rot. There are exceptions to this rule, as in honey, but avoid things that never go bad…like Twinkies.

5) It is not just what you eat, but how you eat. When you are eating a meal, stop eating before you are completely full. You should be satisfied, not stuffed.

6) Enjoy meals with the people you love. Eat your meals at the dinner table, that is what it is for! Avoid eating meals in front of the TV.

7) Don’t buy food where you buy your gasoline.

Today’s workout is our take on the classic speed/interval-style workout known as a fartlek.[hr]

Tuesday> “Fartlek”


BC 4/23

Wednesday@Met> Enter Workout Here.


4.23.14: 400 Twist

140421170019-meb-keflezighi-2-single-image-cut

4.23.14: The Pit @ 6am

WOD
400m Run For Time
40 Lunges
Rest :30
400m Run For Time
40 Pushups
Rest :30
400m Run For Time
40 Jumping Squats
Rest :30
400m Run For Time
40 Pullups
Rest :30
400m Run For Time

Notes: This is not a chipper where the overall workout is timed. We are only timing the 400’s. The in between exercises force you to exert additional energy, continue to add to the muscle fatigue, you’re given a short recovery and then you go back into the 400m run for time.

Photo: Huge congratulations to Meb for becoming the first American to win the Boston Marathon since 1983. Even cooler is how Ryan Hall strategized to help Meb win.

American Strong: The Untold Story of American Teamwork and How Ryan Hall Helped Meb Keflezighi Win Boston


CF Blog April 23

Strength: Deadlift OTM for 7 minutes @85%

tough day at the office...tough day at the office…

WOD:
Start w/400m Run

Then:
21-15-9
Burpee
Box Jumps (30/24)

Finish w/500m Row

***

Proper stacking of the boxes.

If you have been in my classes, you may have heard me mention the subject a time or two (or 12) before.

But for the benefit of those who haven’t been in my classes, I thought I would throw out there how and why we stack our plyo boxes in a certain manner- and it’s not (just) because I’m OCD about how they look 😉

First, only boxes of the same size should be stacked atop each other – i.e., 24″ on 24″, 20″ on 20″, 16″ on 16″, etc. Additionally, the colors need to match up- those that have been spray-painted black were made at a different time and a bit differently than those with the white paint. Subsequently, they will get stuck on each other if stacked together.

So why are we being so picky about this?

Well first and foremost for safety. When boxes are stuck together, people can injure themselves trying to separate them- sometimes if a larger box is stacked on a smaller one, the smaller one isn’t visible and can drop on an unsuspecting foot or toe (painful!).

Additionally, the beat up corners of boxes can wreak some serious havoc on your shins should they make contact.

Speaking of those beat up corners- our boxes are looking in tough shape.  This is because when different size/color boxes are stacked on each other, the brackets on the inside of one box get stuck on the outer edge of the other, making this happen: photo-36Ok, that’s it.  We really appreciate your help in keeping our gym safe and in good condition!


CF WOD April 23

Strength: Deadlift OTM for 7 minutes @85%

WOD:
Start w/400m Run

Then:
21-15-9
Burpee
Box Jumps (30/24)

Finish w/500m Row


YO ADRIAAAAAAN!!!!!

Nice moves this morning, gang. Our workout today was inspired by the training scenes in the Rocky movies. It also pays homage to our bootcamp beginnings at BTB in Atlanta. Hope you enjoyed![hr]

Wednesday’s Workout – “Hearts on Fire: A Tribute to Rocky”  Five 1-minute intervals at each station for total reps per round. Three rounds with a 1-minute rest between each round. Movements are Jump Rope, Stair Climb, Boxer Sit Up, Sandbag Sprint, Dynamic Push Up (1-arm, clapping, one hand on wall, decline, etc.)


BC 4/24

Thursday> It’ll be fast.


CF Blog April 24

Strength: Press 5-5-5photo-37
Partner WOD:
3 rounds, 1 person at a time
8 HSPU
16 Lunge Steps with 1 KB 1.5/1 Do all 8 steps right then left.  KB on
the side you lunge
24 Double Unders
*Other partner holds a plank for 30 sec during the round

***

If you haven’t checked out PsychologyWOD.com yet, you should.  They have some great articles, like this one:

Success is Important, but Don’t You Go Cherry-picking!

BY  

A friend of mine recently gave me an idea for an article.  Her daughter, a sophomore in high school who has struggled with learning disabilities and resulting frustrations with school over the years, had recently earned a string of good grades.  My friend was particularly impressed by how much these relatively small successes were impacting her daughter’s motivation level.  It seemed that success was breeding success, and for the moment, at least, her daughter was more jazzed about school.

When one has endured years of struggle and relative failures, it can become increasingly difficult to stay in the game and keep trying.  For years I worked with kids and adolescents with learning disabilities.  A common theme was how to help them stay engaged and find the desire and fortitude to persevere through the challenges they regularly faced at school.  Much like my friend’s daughter, these kids responded clearly and enthusiastically when they experienced even small tastes of success; they simply needed to know that their hard work was worthwhile.  A good grade on an exam or a positive comment from a teacher meant the world to these kids and often provided just enough fuel for their fires.

We all need to experience success and a sense of pride in ourselves.  We need to know that when we put in hard work with consistency and sincerity, there will ultimately be a payoff in the form of some kind of positive recognition or reward.  We need to save face, feed our self-esteem, and know that we are capable of changing outcomes for ourselves through perseverance and determination, especially when we have struggled at something for quite some time.

Diane Fu, an Olympic-style weightlifting coach at San Francisco CrossFit and Fu Barbell, often talks about how athletes should be realistic with their expectations for performance during training.  My take on this is that it is often true that for every “good day” marked by personal bests or record performances, there are plenty of other seemingly lackluster days filled with drudgery and a need to plod on.  The reality is that it is these seemingly unremarkable training days that set us up for our highs; we need to be patient and have faith that the good days will happen if we continue to put in the less exciting days of work without fanfare.  When the good days come and the PR bells ring, our athlete souls are fed just enough to survive through the next PR famine.

But what if the good days never come?  What if the PR’s and the successes are so few and far between that we can’t access enough faith to continue with our training?  What if we never get a good grade or positive remarks about our schoolwork?  What if our boss never tells us that we’ve done a good job at work, or our spouse forgets to compliment us for months at a time?  What if our kids don’t hear anything good about themselves from the adults in their lives?  Well, that would suck for all of us, wouldn’t it?  We should probably find ways to make sure such droughts don’t happen.

If you’ve followed my blog for any amount of time, you know that I’m not much into shallow self-help, let’s-all-feel-good-about-ourselves talk.  Instead, I’m interested in provoking sincere thinking about how we function in the world and how we can optimize our performance as athletes and as people.  In this vein, today’s post is not about encouraging you to lower your standards, mindlessly pat yourself or your friend or your partner on the back, and constantly tell your kids they’re special and wonderful, just because.  That’s ok sometimes, but generally we need to rein in that in and keep our standards higher.  The idea is this: set goals for yourself and have high expectations that require effort and persistence, but along the way, be sure to build in plenty of opportunities for success.  Working on our weaknesses is imperative, but if that’s all we do, we are likely to burnout and feel lousy about ourselves.  Any good coach or teacher knows this; we need to give students and athletes opportunities to shine amidst their moments of struggle.  The greater the struggle, the more crucial are the doses of success.

So next time you’re feeling down or like you’re in a slump, take note of the last time you set yourself up for success.  Maybe you’ve been working too hard to obtain that one, elusive gymnastics skill and what you really need to do is to lift some heavy weight over your head and ring the PR bell.  Maybe you’ve failed one test too many in that science track you’re taking, and you need to read a good novel and write a paper about it, just to remind yourself what a rockstar you are at literature analysis.  Maybe it’s time you let your partner know how awesome he is at helping around the house or how beautiful she looks without makeup.  The point is that we all need moments of positive recognition, of success, of esteem-building goodness.  They allow us to persevere at all of life’s challenges.  If you’re not having these moments in your life, perhaps it’s time to make some changes—who you’re with, what you do for work, how you’re training for your sport.

But don’t you go cherry-picking.  Cherry-picking means you only show up when you know you’ll do well.  Cherry-picking is looking at the posted workout the night before and deciding to sleep in instead of going to the gym, because the workout plays too much to your weaknesses or is just plain hard.  Cherry-picking means never registering for the class that involves math, despite your significant interest in the other parts of the content.  Cherry-picking means avoiding all social activities with a certain group, simply because you’re intimidated by how smart or funny or good-looking (or whatever) they are.  Finding success sometimes means showing up when you feel like staying home.  You need to balance out the need to feel like a superstar and find success on the one hand, with stick-to-it-iveness and hard work on the other.  You need to take risks.  You need to be honest with yourself and not take the easy way out all the time.  Show up when it’s hard.  Show up when you know the workout will smoke you.  It’ll make something easier at some point down the road.  If you never show up for a battle, there will only ever be more battles down the road.


CF WOD April 24

Strength: Press 5-5-5

Partner WOD:
3 rounds, 1 person at a time
8 HSPU
16 Lunge Steps with 1 KB 1.5/1 Do all 8 steps right then left.  KB on
the side you lunge
24 Double Unders
*Other partner holds a plank for 30 sec during the round


0424Y’know, these aren’t really that “Random”, but anyway…

Move more // Univ of Cambridge

Produce Charts // Chasing Delicious

When and How to Tuck // Business Insider

“Gluten” intolerant // The Onion

The Unsung Hero // Devour

Unsung // YouTube

Heroes // YouTube

This guy photographed my Wedding // Digital Photo Pro

Does Milk Do a Body good, really? // Take Part

Why Am I Dead? // NPR

Mrs. Doubtfire Sequel? // E Online

A 3-fer from Fast Co. Design // Design a Font : Dashboard Font : Top 10 Innovative Companies in Design

DYK: Forward movement like walking and running is actually the process of losing, and catching your balance.[hr]

Thursday> Speed: “Sprint or Die” – 10 Rounds of 100m Sprint with walk as recovery. WoD1: 100 Squats for time. WoD2: 50 Push Ups for time.


CF Blog April 25

Strength: Back Squat 2RMphoto-38

WOD:
2 Rounds (20 minute time cap)
5 Hang PC (135/95)
100yd Sprint
10 Push Press (135/95)
75yd Sprint
20 KB Swings 2/1.5
50yd Sprint
30 Slam Balls (Heavy as you can do)
25yd Sprint
Rest 3 mins and repeat

*Shuttle style Sprints

***

It’s getting warmer…

make sure you dress appropriately for the weather and hydrate throughout the day!  Bring a water bottle with you to class to fill at one of our water fountains!


CF WOD April 25

Strength: Back Squat 2RM

WOD:
2 Rounds (20 minute time cap)
5 Hang PC (135/95)
100yd Sprint
10 Push Press (135/95)
75yd Sprint
20 KB Swings 2/1.5
50yd Sprint
30 Slam Balls (Heavy as you can do)
25yd Sprint
Rest 3 mins and repeat

*Shuttle style Sprints


BC 4/24

Friday> WoD: 20-1 Descending Ladder of Dips and Step Ups (ea. leg), separated by a Stair Run. Speed: 5x 50m Partner Hill Sprints.


0425Athletes don’t wear flip flops. And neither should you.

But seriously, read this. Yes, they look cool and they’re convenient, but prolonged use ain’t no good.[hr]

Friday> WoD: 20-1 Descending Ladder of Dips and Step Ups (ea. leg), separated by a Stair Run. Speed: 5x 50m Partner Hill Sprints.


4.26.14: Up and Down

2014-03-02 13.32.01

4.26.14: AG Track @ 9:30am

WOD
2x 200m (rest :30 after each)
400m (rest 1:00)
800m (rest 2:00)
1000m (rest 3:00)
800m (rest 2:00)
400m (rest 1:00)
2x 200m (rest :30)

Note: this picture is from when my 5 year old daughter, Towne, ran a 400m loop around the track. Yes, she got a treat for that one!

Link: http://www.runnersworld.com/boston-marathon/shalane-flanagan-ran-to-win
Here’s a story about Shalane Flanagan. She ran the Boston Marathon in 2:22:02, faster than any American woman. And she did it with style. She ran like Pre used to. She ran it to win it. She ran it hard from the start to try and break the other runners. Too often today, the elite runners hold their pace really slow upfront and then see who has the best kick towards the end. Pre, and now Shalane, made someone truly earn their victory. She is the reason the times were so fast for the top women. She may not have won the race, but she proved to be a fierce runner and competitor.


CF Blog April 26

WOD: “Filthy Fifty” – Tabata Stylephoto-39
50 Box Jumps (20”)
50 Jumping Pull-ups
50 KB Swings (1 pood)
50 Walking Lunges
50 Knees to Elbows
50 Push Presses (45/35)
50 Back Extensions
50 Wall Balls (20/14)
50 Burpees
50 Double Unders

*Finish as quickly as possible using Tabata intervals*

***

Interesting read about minimalist running shoes from Dr. Nick’s Running Blog:

 

Two year long case study demonstrating an increase in arch height from running in minimalist shoes.

The debate is ongoing as to the use of minimalist shoes and running barefoot. Few studies have been done and there are so many variables to control which makes these existing studies practically irrelevant. To see the true effects of what happens to our foot by removing the external support from a traditional motion control running shoe, it takes time. Years actually. I would like to share an example of a runner who had abandoned her rigid orthotics and motion control ASICS running shoesand began wearing minimalist shoes. The New Balance Minimus with a zero drop to be exact.

She was 34 two and a half years ago and had flexible flat feet, a valgus position of the calcaneus ( the heel bone angles inward when observing from behind), and a valgus knee deformity (knock knees). Her symptoms consisted of knee pain as well as frequent lower back pain. She was wearing custom rigid orthotics which were implemented to realign her arch and heel bone. We had her follow my transition protocol of removing the orthotics for the first part of a run and then replacing them for the remainder. As an example, for a three mile run the orthotics would be removed for a half mile then placed back in for the remaining 2.5 miles. This was gradually increased each week until she was able to comfortably run without them. The same was done for the motion control shoes but in a slower manner. I advise using the 10% rule. Each week mileage is increased wearing the minimalist shoe by 10%. Again, the new shoe is worn first and the run is completed in the traditional shoe. This can sometimes take up to 6-8 weeks or more depending on the level of running a person is doing before the complete transition is made. Many times I tell the patient it takes 3 months to safely transition. Remember, three months can be a blink of an eye in the whole scheme of things as many patients present to me with years of pain.

Of course what I am about to share is anecdotal. I realize that. However, this is a two year example of the changes that can occur to an adults foot that results from strengthening the postural muscles of the foot, specifically the abdcutor hallucis muscle. This is not the direct result of simply wearing a minimalist shoe. This is the result of what happens when you stress the foot and let it work the way it was intended to and become stronger. It has not relied on external support and adapted to the stresses placed upon it. The studies that are currently being published share weeks or sometimes a few months of results. This is a 2 year example. My colleagues and I are also submitting for publication a 6 month study that will show objective results of a similar finding. Let’s see what happens to the foot when you do not rely on orthotics and motion control shoes.

Heel Alignment
The below pictures shows the improvement in the alignment if the heel bone known as the calcaneous. You can see in 2012 the calcaneous was more everted or slanted inward as a result of a weak abductor hallucis muscle which leads to a collapse of the medial longitudinal arch. In 2014 the calcaneous is now more rectus or vertically orientated. This is a result of a stronger abductor hallucis muscle pulling and shortening between the great toe and heel bone which improves the arch and straightens the heel or calcaneous bone.

Continue reading…


CF WOD April 26

WOD: “Filthy Fifty” – Tabata Style
50 Box Jumps (20”)
50 Jumping Pull-ups
50 KB Swings (1 pood)
50 Walking Lunges
50 Knees to Elbows
50 Push Presses (45/35)
50 Back Extensions
50 Wall Balls (20/14)
50 Burpees
50 Double Unders

*Finish as quickly as possible using Tabata intervals*


CF Blog April 27

WOD:photo-40
4 Rounds
10 KB Swings (1.5/1)
10 Squats w/ KB in Rack Position (RT)
25yd One Arm Farmer’s Walk w/ KB in Rack Position (RT)
10 KB Swings (1.5/1)
10 Squats w/ KB in Rack Position (LT)
25yd One Arm Farmer’s Walk w/ KB in Rack Position (LT)

Cash Out: 1K Row


CF WOD April 27

WOD:
4 Rounds
10 KB Swings (1.5/1)
10 Squats w/ KB in Rack Position (RT)
25yd One Arm Farmer’s Walk w/ KB in Rack Position (RT)
10 KB Swings (1.5/1)
10 Squats w/ KB in Rack Position (LT)
25yd One Arm Farmer’s Walk w/ KB in Rack Position (LT)

Cash Out: 1K Row


BC 4/28

Monday @ the Met> Partners in the Garage


4.28.14: Mile Half Mile

UCF End_Keith_100s_9_Fotor

4.28.14: AG Track at 6pm

WOD
1600m Run
– rest 2:00
2x 800m Run
– rest 2:00 after each
1600m Run

The miles should each be run at a similar pace. But I want you to pick the pace up a bit on the 800’s. We’re giving you 2:00 rest after each 800’s, so shoot for about a :15 per mile increase in speed. i.e. if you run a 7:00 mile, then the 800’s should be around roughly 3:37.

Please note that there’s a chance of rain tomorrow. We will track the rain throughout the day and let you know by 5:00 if the class is still on. If it’s obvious before that, then we’ll post here and on Facebook.

Pic: had to pull out this awesome pic of Keith rolling on some 100’s from last year.


CF Blog April 28

Strength: 20 minutes to establish a 1RM Cleanphoto-41

WOD: Master’s Qualifier Mash-up
AMRAP 15
5 Muscle-ups*
5 Snatches (135/95)**
30 Calorie Row
25 Wall Balls (20/14)
50 Double Unders

*Can use these movements as rx subs for mu’s and snatches
*10 C2B Pull-ups
**15 KB Swings (2/1.5)

***

Momma’s Quote of the Week: “If one can stick to the training throughout the years, then will power is no longer a problem. It’s raining? That doesn’t matter. I am tired? That’s beside the point. It’s simply that I just have to.” -Emil Zatopek

***

Great read from Mark’s Daily Apple:

How Much Protein Should You Be Eating?

ribsI get a lot of emails on a lot of subjects. “Mark, is toothpaste Primal?” “How many micrograms of wheat germ agglutinin can I safely consume each day?” “Did Grok even lift?” Usually, I manage to address them in the Monday Dear Mark posts, but sometimes a question deserves its own dedicated midweek post. Today’s question, or rather pair of questions, definitely qualifies. First is the titular question, “How much protein should I eat?” I get that one a lot, even though I’ve covered this in my books and in various blog posts. The second question is “How much protein do you eat, Mark?” Before we get to my protein intake (which has changed in recent years) let’s explore how much protein you should be eating. The answer – wait for it – depends on who (and what) you are. Your goals, your age, your activity levels, your size, and your health status all impact how much protein you need. And although individual protein requirements ultimately depend on dozens of variables that we can’t really know, there are some baseline intakes that can serve as a foundation for different groups. Let’s take a look.

 

The Sedentary

The RDA of 0.8 g protein/kg bodyweight or 0.36 g protein/lb bodyweight assumes you are sedentary, uninterested in gaining muscle, and free of health issues that might compromise your lean mass. If that describes you, the RDA is a good baseline from which to experiment. Just don’t go below that.

The Active

Athletes need more protein than the average person, but perhaps not as much as most fitness enthusiasts think (or consume). A 2011 paper on optimal protein intakes for athletes concluded that 1.8 g protein/kg bodyweight (or 0.8 g protein/lb bodyweight) maximizes muscle protein synthesis (while higher amounts are good for dieting athletes interested in preserving lean mass), whereas another settled on “a diet with 12-15% of its energy as protein,” assuming “total energy intake is sufficient to cover the high expenditures caused by daily training” (which could be quite high). One study even found benefit in 2-3 g protein/kg bodyweight (0.9-1.4 g protein/lb bodyweight) for athletes, a significant increase over standard recommendations. That said, I wouldn’t be too quick to discount anecdotal evidence or “iron lore.” A significant-enough portion of the strength training community swears by 1-2 g protein/lb bodyweightthat it couldn’t hurt to try if lower amounts aren’t working for you.

The Dieters

Weight loss involves a caloric deficit (whether arrived at spontaneously or consciously). Unfortunately, caloric deficits rarely discriminate between lean mass and body fat, while most people are interested in losing fat, not muscle/bone/tendon/sinew/organ. Numerous studies show that increasing your protein intake during weight loss will partially offset the lean mass loss that tends to occur. In obese and pre-obese women, a 750 calorie diet with 30% of calories from protein (about 56 grams) preserved more lean mass during weight loss than an 18% protein diet. Another study in women showed that a 1.6 g protein/kg bodyweight (or 0.7 g protein/lb bodyweight) diet led to more weight loss, more fat loss, and less lean mass loss than a 0.8 g protein/kg bodyweight diet. Among dieting athletes, 2.3 g protein/kg bodyweight (or a little over 1 g protein/lb bodyweight) was far superior to 1.0 g protein/kg bodyweight in preserving lean mass. And, although specific protein intake recommendations were not stated, a recent meta-analysis concluded that high-protein weight loss diets help preserve lean mass.

The Injured

Healing wounds increases protein requirements. After all, you’re literally rebuilding lost or damaged tissue, the very definition of an anabolic state. One review recommends around 1.5 g protein/kg bodyweight or close to 0.7 g protein/lb bodyweight for injured patients.

Read more: 


CF WOD April 28

Strength: 20 minutes to establish a 1RM Clean

WOD: Master’s Qualifier Mash-up
AMRAP 15
5 Muscle-ups*
5 Snatches (135/95)**
30 Calorie Row
25 Wall Balls (20/14)
50 Double Unders

*Can use these movements as rx subs for mu’s and snatches
*10 C2B Pull-ups
**15 KB Swings (2/1.5)


0428Every go out for a jog and, while, you’re running you’re mind wanders. Sometimes those thoughts make sense. Others… not so much. Here’s a list of (75) thoughts every runner has while they’re out… running.[hr]

WoD 1: Parking Garage Team Circuit: Two groups, each stairwell: burpees, lunges, planks and stair runs. WoD 2: 21-15-9 push-up/sit-up with 4min time cap.


BC 4/29

Tuesday> Hill Runs ‘n stuff


CF Blog April 29

Strength: Back Squat 5×3 @80%10322777_10152354444800568_2975381426754698013_n

WOD:
4 Rounds
10 Push Press (135/95)
400m Run

***

Endurance News!!

Starting this week (May 3rd), Endurance class will be at 8:30 am Saturdays.

Hopefully this should avoid any conflicts with soccer and lacrosse games!

See you on the track!


CF WOD April 29

Strength: Back Squat 5×3 @80%

WOD:
4 Rounds
10 Push Press (135/95)
400m Run


0429Letting a little secret out. We’re about to do more running. So, put that in your head, get used to it, get over it. Not so good at the running? We’ll work with you on some technique and scale anything that needs to be scaled. So, prepare your legs and lungs. We’re running. We may even have a little “clinic” one morning to address some common issues in running technique. We will look for ways to improve efficiency. In the meantime, check this out.[hr]

Tuesday> WoD1: Hill Burpee Suicides. WoD2: 30 sec Ab Throwdowns. WoD3: 10-1 Alternating Toe Taps and Spiderman Push Ups


4.30.14: Back to the Rower

Screen Shot 2014-04-28 at 9.39.45 PM

4.30.14: 6am at The Pit

WOD
Row AFAP in 10:00
20 Wall Balls (20/14)
20 Ball Slams (30/20)
20 Burpees
20 Over the Box Jumps (24/20)
Row AFAP in 10:00

We haven’t rowed in a bit, so we’re getting after the rower in the a.m. And we’re going to mix in some other conditioning to help push ourselves. Plus, it’ll give a nice break from sitting on the rower. I do challenge you on the second row to try and beat your distance on the first attempt. You’ll have to dig pretty deep for that as your legs will be fatigued from the prior work. Push yourself.

Pic: yesterday was the last AG home soccer match, which forced us off the track. That ended up being a great thing. We hit the neighboring roads for some intervals, enjoyed the perfect weather, and wore out the legs at the same time. We will certainly do that more often as it’s a nice change of course.

TIME CHANGE: Saturday classes will now be moved to 8:30am


BC 4/30

Wednesday@Met> Grab a partner and a sandbag…


Buddy Program

Ultimate Crossfit  

Buddy/Mentor Program

We are looking for a few good Mentors to provide support, guidance, and assistance to our recent Foundations Program Graduates. 
The idea is to provide a smooth transition for our newest members from the smaller Foundations classes into the bigger group classes. 
Think of it as a kind of “show you the ropes” role. 
We will pair you with somebody based on when you workout. 

If you are interested in being a buddy to our new additions, or if you are interested in having a buddy at the gym to help you get started please contact tricia@ultimatecrossfit.com with your name and time of day that you workout.

 

 


Functional Movement Screening

Coming soon to Ultimate Crossfit…

the Functional Movement Screen

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed by Gray Cook and Lee Burton to screen athletes for mobility, motor control and/or stability issues. The following organizations are currently using the screen to help assess professional athletes’ risk for injury: NFL, PGA, NBA, NCAA, & MLB.
The goal of the screen is to reduce compensation and decrease injury risk, by targeting an athlete’s faulty movement patterns and reducing compensations that have been created through dysfunctional training. The screen is made up of 7 exercises, looking at how your body moves as a whole. The results of the screen will then help us develop an individualized program of corrective exercises for you to help work on any weaknesses or imbalances that you may have.If you continue to train with dysfunctional movement (i.e. weakness, imbalances, mobility issues, etc.), you will be training in a dysfunctional manner, which will put you at risk for injury and decrease your ability to workout at your highest potential.
More information on our FMS Program will be coming soon. Be sure to check the website and this featured piece for updates.

 


CF Blog April 30

Strength: Weighted Pull-ups 3-3-3-3photo-42

WOD:
4 Rounds
50 Double Unders
20 Push-ups
15 Toes 2 Bar

POST WOD: Group Stretch

***

**Important Note**

If you have not done so already, please make sure you fill out an updated version of our Ultimate CrossFit waiver.   This is necessary for everyone in order to continue to work out at our gym.  To make this easier we’ve created a link to an online version that you can fill out and use an electronic signature.

https://www.smartwaiver.com/w/534334490909e/web/

***

Endurance News!!

Starting this week (May 3rd), Endurance class will be at 8:30 am Saturdays.

Hopefully this should help beat the heat and avoid any conflicts with soccer and lacrosse games!

 


CF WOD April 30

Strength: Weighted Pull-ups 3-3-3-3

WOD:
4 Rounds
50 Double Unders
20 Push-ups
15 Toes 2 Bar

POST WOD: Group Stretch


0430That’s it. You’re planks are over. Well, at least as far as the Challenge is concerned. Did you make it through all 30 days? How far did you get and what was your final count?

Why are these damn planks so good for us, anydamnway? Check this post that talks about planks being the “magic bullet” for hip mobility. That’s just one benefit. Core strength, multi-joint stability, mental toughness…

Any thoughts on a May Challenge? I’ve got a couple thoughts, but wonder what y’all think.

*Note: the Endurance class time for Saturday has moved up to 8:30 AM at AG Middle School.*[hr]

Wednesday@Met> Partners Share: 400m Sandbag Run + 75 Push Ups + 200 Mtn Climbers + 75 Sandbag Squats + 200 Mtn Climbers + 75 Sandbag Lunges + 200 Mtn Climbers + 75 Burpees + 400m Sandbag Run


CF Blog May 1

Strength: RDL 5-5-5photo-43

WOD:
800m Run
10-1 KB Swings (2/1.5)
1-10 Box Jumps (30/24)
800m Run

***

from Annemarie:

Hey everyone,
I haven’t been around the gym in awhile, but I wanted to let everyone know that my annual Cinco de Mayo party is TODAY from 5:00-8:00 at my office, 3507 Monroe Rd. There will be a band, margarita machine, beer, wine and homemade empanadas. The party is always a big hit and a lot of UCFers will be there. So, please spread the word. Hope to see you there!!

***

New t-shirts are here!!!  $25 – get ’em while they’re hot!!

IMG_1170


CF WOD May 1

Strength: RDL 5-5-5

WOD:
800m Run
10-1 KB Swings (2/1.5)
1-10 Box Jumps (30/24)
800m Run


BC 5/1

Thursday> Fastness.